• Artificial propagation and neonatal care of passerines as an effective tool for in-situ species recovery programs

      Switzer, Richard A.; Cristinacce, A.; Ladkoo, A.; Goltz, T.; Ward, G.; Kuehler, Cyndi M.; Lieberman, Alan A.; Jones, C.; (2010)
    • Augmentation of the Puaiohi population through captive propagation and release on the Alakai Plateau, Kauai, Hawaii, USA

      Switzer, Richard A.; Lieberman, Alan A.; Nelson, J.; Crampton, L.; Soorae, P.S. (IUCN Species Survival Commission, Re-introduction Specialist Group and Abu Dhabi, AE : Environment Agency-Abu DhabiGland, Switzerland, 2013)
      The Puaiohi, also known as the small Kauai thrush, is listed as Critically Endangered by IUCN/BirdLife and Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is one of only two remaining Hawaiian species in the genus Myadestes, formerly comprising six Hawaiian species....
    • Changes in vocal repertoire of the Hawaiian crow, Corvus hawaiiensis, from past wild to current captive populations

      Tanimoto, Ann M.; Hart, Patrick J.; Pack, Adam A.; Switzer, Richard A.; Banko, Paul C.; Ball, Donna L.; Sebastián-González, Esther; Komarczyk, Lisa; Warrington, Miyako H. (2017)
      ...We compared the vocal repertoire of three of the last four wild 'alalā pairs from the early 1990s to three current captive pairs on the Island of Hawai'i to determine how acoustic behaviour has been affected by changes in their social and physical environment. Over 18 h of recordings from wild breeding pairs were analysed and compared with 44 h from captive breeding pairs....
    • Discovery of species-wide tool use in the Hawaiian crow

      Rutz, Christian; Klump, Barbara C.; Komarczyk, Lisa; Leighton, Rosanna; Kramer, Joshua; Wischnewski, Saskia; Sugasawa, Shoko; Morrissey, Michael B.; James, Richard; St Clair, James J. H.; et al. (2016)
      ...Here we show that another tropical corvid, the ‘Alalā (C. hawaiiensis; Hawaiian crow), is a highly dexterous tool user. Although the ‘Alalā became extinct in the wild in the early 2000s, and currently survives only in captivity5, at least two lines of evidence suggest that tool use is part of the species’ natural behavioural repertoire: juveniles develop functional tool use without training, or social input from adults; and proficient tool use is a species-wide capacity....
    • Effects of inbreeding and parental incubation on captive breeding success in Hawaiian crows

      Hoeck, Paquita E. A.; Wolak, Matthew E.; Switzer, Richard A.; Kuehler, Cyndi M.; Lieberman, Alan A. (2015)
      We used 17 years of captive breeding records of the Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) to study the effects of individual and parental level of inbreeding on survival through early life…. Our study contributes to evidence that the strength of inbreeding depression is particularly severe in early life traits. It shows that the negative effects of inbreeding on reproductive success should be accounted for even in benign captive environments where survival is maximized and suggests that parental incubation should be favored over artificial incubation in avian captive breeding programs.
    • Seed dispersal by a captive corvid: the role of the ‘Alalā (Corvus hawaiiensis) in shaping Hawai‘i's plant communities

      Culliney, Susan; Pejchar, Liba; Switzer, Richard A.; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana (2012)
      ...The endangered ‘Alalā (Corvus hawaiiensis), the largest remaining species of native Hawaiian forest bird, was once common in mesic and dry forests on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, but today it exists solely in captivity. Prior to its extinction in the wild, the ‘Alalā may have helped to establish and maintain native Hawaiian forest communities by dispersing seeds of a wide variety of native plants....
    • Vocal repertoire and signal characteristics of 'Alalā, the Hawaiian Crow (Corvus hawaiiensis)

      Tanimoto, Ann M.; Hart, Patrick J.; Pack, Adam A.; Switzer, Richard A. (2017)
      The critically endangered Hawaiian Crow or ′Alalā (Corvus hawaiiensis) is currently extinct in the wild and the remaining 115 individuals are being captively managed on Hawai′i and Maui Islands by the Zoological Society of San Diego. Here we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the vocal repertoire of this species....