• Development of a SNP-based assay for measuring genetic diversity in the Tasmanian devil insurance population

      Wright, Belinda; Morris, Katrina; Grueber, Catherine E.; Willet, Cali E.; Gooley, Rebecca; Hogg, Carolyn J.; O’Meally, Denis; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna; Wade, Claire; et al. (2015)
      The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) has undergone a recent, drastic population decline due to the highly contagious devil facial tumor disease. The tumor is one of only two naturally occurring transmissible cancers and is almost inevitably fatal. In 2006 a disease-free insurance population was established to ensure that the Tasmanian devil is protected from extinction. The insurance program is dependent upon preserving as much wild genetic diversity as possible to maximize the success of subsequent reintroductions to the wild. Accurate genotypic data is vital to the success of the program to ensure that loss of genetic diversity does not occur in captivity. Until recently, microsatellite markers have been used to study devil population genetics, however as genetic diversity is low in the devil and potentially decreasing in the captive population, a more sensitive genotyping assay is required.