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dc.contributor.authorThomas-Walters, Laura
dc.contributor.authorMcNulty, Claire
dc.contributor.authorVeríssimo, Diogo
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T21:30:32Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T21:30:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier1654-7209
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13280-019-01271-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/100
dc.description.abstractWith the recognition that most global environmental problems are a result of human actions, there is an increasing interest in approaches which have the potential to influence human behaviour. Images have a powerful role in shaping persuasive messages, yet research on the impacts of visual representations of nature is a neglected area in biodiversity conservation. We systematically screened existing studies on the use of animal imagery in conservation, identifying 37 articles. Although there is clear evidence that images of animals can have positive effects on people’s attitudes to animals, overall there is currently a dearth of accessible and comparable published data demonstrating the efficacy of animal imagery. Most existing studies are place and context-specific, limiting the generalisable conclusions that can be drawn. Transdisciplinary research is needed to develop a robust understanding of the contextual and cultural factors that affect how animal images can be used effectively for conservation purposes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-019-01271-1
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGY
dc.subjectMARKETING
dc.subjectNATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
dc.titleA scoping review into the impact of animal imagery on pro-environmental outcomes
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAmbio
dc.source.volume49
dc.source.beginpage1135
dc.source.endpage1145
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-04T19:22:34Z
html.description.abstractWith the recognition that most global environmental problems are a result of human actions, there is an increasing interest in approaches which have the potential to influence human behaviour. Images have a powerful role in shaping persuasive messages, yet research on the impacts of visual representations of nature is a neglected area in biodiversity conservation. We systematically screened existing studies on the use of animal imagery in conservation, identifying 37 articles. Although there is clear evidence that images of animals can have positive effects on people’s attitudes to animals, overall there is currently a dearth of accessible and comparable published data demonstrating the efficacy of animal imagery. Most existing studies are place and context-specific, limiting the generalisable conclusions that can be drawn. Transdisciplinary research is needed to develop a robust understanding of the contextual and cultural factors that affect how animal images can be used effectively for conservation purposes.


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    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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