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dc.contributor.authorSas-Rolfes, Michael T.
dc.contributor.authorHinsley, Amy
dc.contributor.authorVeríssimo, Diogo
dc.contributor.authorMilner-Gulland, E. J.
dc.contributor.authorChallender, Daniel W. S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T21:30:33Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T21:30:33Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier1543-5938
dc.identifier.doi10.1146/annurev-environ-101718-033253
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/118
dc.description.abstractIllegal wildlife trade (IWT) has increased in profile in recent years as a global policy issue, largely because of its association with declines in prominent internationally trafficked species. In this review, we explore the scale of IWT, associated threats to biodiversity, and appropriate responses to these threats. We discuss the historical development of IWT research and highlight the uncertainties that plague the evidence base, emphasizing the need for more systematic approaches to addressing evidence gaps in a way that minimizes the risk of unethical or counterproductive outcomes for wildlife and people. We highlight the need for evaluating interventions in order to learn, and the importance of sharing datasets and lessons learned. A more collaborative approach to linking IWT research, practice, and policy would better align public policy discourse and action with research evidence. This in turn would enable more effective policy making that contributes to reducing the threat to biodiversity that IWT represents.
dc.description.sponsorshipUN Environment
dc.description.sponsorshipEarthmind
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-environ-101718-033253
dc.subjectCITES
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CRIME
dc.subjectPOACHING
dc.subjectREGULATIONS
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES
dc.titleIllegal wildlife trade: Scale, processes, and governance
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAnnual Review of Environment and Resources
dc.source.volume44
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage201
dc.source.endpage228
html.description.abstractIllegal wildlife trade (IWT) has increased in profile in recent years as a global policy issue, largely because of its association with declines in prominent internationally trafficked species. In this review, we explore the scale of IWT, associated threats to biodiversity, and appropriate responses to these threats. We discuss the historical development of IWT research and highlight the uncertainties that plague the evidence base, emphasizing the need for more systematic approaches to addressing evidence gaps in a way that minimizes the risk of unethical or counterproductive outcomes for wildlife and people. We highlight the need for evaluating interventions in order to learn, and the importance of sharing datasets and lessons learned. A more collaborative approach to linking IWT research, practice, and policy would better align public policy discourse and action with research evidence. This in turn would enable more effective policy making that contributes to reducing the threat to biodiversity that IWT represents.


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  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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