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dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorMartin-Wintle, Meghan S.
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorZhou X.
dc.contributor.authorZhang H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-11T23:10:24Z
dc.date.available2020-05-11T23:10:24Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/acv.12418
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/132
dc.description.abstractThe behavioral competence of captive-bred individuals - an important source population for translocation programs - may differ from that of wild-born individuals and these differences may influence post-release survival. Some behaviors will be more robust, or developmentally stable, than others in the face of the environmental novelties of captivity. Here, we investigated developmental stability of foraging behavior by quantifying bamboo feeding behavior in captive-bred and wild-born giant pandas, Ailuropoda melanleuca. As an energy-limited species adapted to a low-nutrition diet, any reductions in feeding efficiency may compromise post-release survival. Using video of 22 captive pandas, we measured several components of the panda's elaborate bamboo feeding behavior repertoire. We found that captive-born and wild-born pandas displayed the same repertoire of feeding behaviors, suggesting developmental stability in these motor patterns, but that they employed them differently with different parts of the bamboo. Captive-born pandas devoted less time and effort to handling and chewing leaves while allocating more effort to the consumption of large culms than did wild?born pandas. Captive-born pandas also handled small culm and stripped small culms to prepare them for consumption less often than did wild?born pandas. All of these behavioral differences indicate that wild-born pandas in captivity behave in a manner more similar to wild pandas, and focus their behavioral effort on more nutritious bamboo. Thus, these aspects of captive-born panda feeding behavior may be compromised, and were not developmentally stable in the captive environment. These behavioral differences are cause for concern and should be the subject of future study to determine whether they forecast compromised fitness in translocations. Evaluating developmental stability and behavioral competence should be a key component of captive-release translocation programs, serving to guide pre-release training and selection of individuals to be released.
dc.relation.urlhttps://zslpublications.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/acv.12418
dc.rights2018 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectGIANT PANDAS
dc.subjectTRANSLOCATION
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectFORAGING
dc.subjectFEEDING
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.subjectBAMBOO
dc.titleDevelopmental stability of foraging behavior: evaluating suitability of captive giant pandas for translocation
dc.titleDevelopmental stability of foraging behavior: evaluating suitability of captive giant pandas for translocation
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAnimal Conservation
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.beginpage474
dc.source.endpage482
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-11T23:10:24Z
html.description.abstractThe behavioral competence of captive-bred individuals - an important source population for translocation programs - may differ from that of wild-born individuals and these differences may influence post-release survival. Some behaviors will be more robust, or developmentally stable, than others in the face of the environmental novelties of captivity. Here, we investigated developmental stability of foraging behavior by quantifying bamboo feeding behavior in captive-bred and wild-born giant pandas, Ailuropoda melanleuca. As an energy-limited species adapted to a low-nutrition diet, any reductions in feeding efficiency may compromise post-release survival. Using video of 22 captive pandas, we measured several components of the panda's elaborate bamboo feeding behavior repertoire. We found that captive-born and wild-born pandas displayed the same repertoire of feeding behaviors, suggesting developmental stability in these motor patterns, but that they employed them differently with different parts of the bamboo. Captive-born pandas devoted less time and effort to handling and chewing leaves while allocating more effort to the consumption of large culms than did wild?born pandas. Captive-born pandas also handled small culm and stripped small culms to prepare them for consumption less often than did wild?born pandas. All of these behavioral differences indicate that wild-born pandas in captivity behave in a manner more similar to wild pandas, and focus their behavioral effort on more nutritious bamboo. Thus, these aspects of captive-born panda feeding behavior may be compromised, and were not developmentally stable in the captive environment. These behavioral differences are cause for concern and should be the subject of future study to determine whether they forecast compromised fitness in translocations. Evaluating developmental stability and behavioral competence should be a key component of captive-release translocation programs, serving to guide pre-release training and selection of individuals to be released.


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2018 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as 2018 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.