• Human visual identification of individual Andean bears Tremarctos ornatus

      Van Horn, Russell C.; Zug, Becky; LaCombe, Corrin; Velez-Liendo, Ximena; Paisley, Susanna (2014)
      It is often challenging to use invasive methods of individual animal identification for population estimation, demographic analyses, and other ecological and behavioral analyses focused on individual-level processes. Recent improvements in camera traps make it possible to collect many photographic samples yet most investigators either leap from photographic sampling to assignment of individual identity without considering identification errors, or else to avoid those errors they develop computerized methods that produce accurate data with the unintended cost of excluding participation by local citizens. To assess human ability to visually identify Andean bears Tremarctos ornatus from their pelage markings we used surveys and experimental testing of 381 observers viewing photographs of 70 Andean bears of known identity. Neither observer experience nor confidence predicted their initial success rate at identifying individuals. However, after gaining experience observers were able to achieve an average success at identifying adult bears of 73.2%, and brief simple training further improved the ability of observers such that 24.8% of them achieved 100% success. Interestingly, observers who were initially more likely to falsely identify two photos of the same bear as two different bears than vice versa were likely to continue making errors and their bias became stronger, not weaker. Such biases would lead to inaccurate population estimates, invalid assessments of the bears involved in conflict situations, and underestimates of bear movements. We thus illustrate that in some systems accurate data on individual identity can be generated without the use of computerized algorithms, allowing for community engagement and citizen science. In addition, we show that when using observers to collect data on animal identity it is important to consider not only the overall frequency of observer error, but also observer biases and error types, which are rarely reported in field studies.
    • Phenotypic plasticity in the timing of reproduction in Andean bears

      Appleton, R. D.; Van Horn, Russell C.; Noyce, K. V.; Spady, T. J.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Arcese, P. (2018)
      Many factors influence whether mammals reproduce seasonally or continuously but disentangling them can be challenging in free‐living species that are hard to observe. We described the seasonality of reproduction in Andean bears (Tremarctos ornatus) in NW Peru (6°26′S, 79°33′W) to test for phenotypic plasticity in response to extrinsic cues.
    • Photos provide information on age, but not kinship, of Andean bear

      Van Horn, Russell C.; Zug, Becky; Appleton, Robyn D.; Velez-Liendo, Ximena; Paisley, Susanna; LaCombe, Corrin (2015)
      Using photos of captive Andean bears of known age and pedigree, and photos of wild Andean bear cubs <6 months old, we evaluated the degree to which visual information may be used to estimate bears’ ages and assess their kinship. We demonstrate that the ages of Andean bear cubs ≤6 months old may be estimated from their size relative to their mothers with an average error of <0.01 ± 13.2 days (SD; n = 14), and that ages of adults ≥10 years old may be estimated from the proportion of their nose that is pink with an average error of <0.01 ± 3.5 years (n = 41). We also show that similarity among the bears’ natural markings, as perceived by humans, is not associated with pedigree kinship among the bears (R2 < 0.001, N = 1,043, p = 0.499). Thus, researchers may use photos of wild Andean bears to estimate the ages of young cubs and older adults, but not to infer their kinship. Given that camera trap photos are one of the most readily available sources of information on large cryptic mammals, we suggest that similar methods be tested for use in other poorly understood species.
    • Reducing human impacts on Andean bears in NW Peru through community-based conservation

      Young, Samantha; Van Horn, Russell C.; Glikman, Jenny A.; Nevin, Owen; Convery, Ian; Davis, Peter (Boydell & BrewerNewcastle, UK, 2019)
      Andean bears live throughout the tropical Andes in a large latitudinal and elevational gradient across diverse habitats. They are threatened throughout their range by habitat loss, habitat fragmentation, and hunting, and in many places they overlap with human settlements and agricultural fields, creating competition or conflict for resources....
    • Rub-tree selection by Andean bears in the Peruvian dry forest

      Kleiner, Jack D.; Van Horn, Russell C.; Swenson, Jon E.; Steyaert, Sam M.J.G. (2018)
      To advance our knowledge on the rubbing behavior of Andean bears (Tremarctos ornatus), we assessed characteristics of their rub-trees in the Peruvian tropical dry forest, where water is a rare and critical resource. We registered characteristics of rubbed and unrubbed trees and shrubs along bear trails in an area of approximately 100 km2 surrounding 7 waterholes in the western Andes foothills of Peru during austral summer 2014–2015....
    • The Andean bear alopecia syndrome may be caused by social housing

      Van Horn, Russell C.; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Sarcos, Andrés E. Bracho; Thomas, Gaylene; Shanks, Jacob A.; Owen, Megan A. (2019)
      The Andean bear alopecia syndrome is a progressive and chronic condition documented in ex situ populations. Recent advances focus on treating symptoms, not preventing future cases. We therefore explored the epidemiology of this syndrome through an analysis of husbandry and veterinary conditions of 63 Andean bears (26M:37F) housed in North and South American zoos and other ex situ circumstances. We had the most complete information for the North American population and found that 29% of females (n = 24) were affected. No males (n = 26) were affected. An analysis of generalized linear models indicated that three models were competitive in describing the occurrence of the condition (i.e., ?AICc ? 2): the model including only the individual's sex (?2 = 13.41, df = 1, p < .001), the model including both individual sex and social housing status (?2 = 1.36, df = 2, p < .001), and the model including both individual sex and the expression of stereotypical behaviors (?2 = 13.82, df = 2, p = .001). Stereotypical behaviors were common among both males (50%, n = 26) and females (51.9%, n = 27) whether or not they were affected, but the syndrome was seen only in females who had been socially housed. Therefore, we suggest that the Andean bear alopecia syndrome is a symptomatic response to the long-term social housing of bears that would otherwise not live socially. To prevent new cases, we recommend that female Andean bears be housed with adult conspecifics only when females choose to cohabitate.