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dc.contributor.authorZimkus, Breda M
dc.contributor.authorHassapakis, Craig L
dc.contributor.authorHouck, Marlys L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/150
dc.description.abstractGlobal amphibian declines associated with anthropogenic causes, climate change, and amphibianspecific infectious diseases (e.g., chytridiomycosis) have highlighted the importance of biobanking amphibian genetic material. Genetic resource collections were the first to centralize the long-term storage of samples for use in basic science, including disciplines such as molecular evolution, molecular genetics, phylogenetics, and systematics. Biobanks associated with conservation breeding programs put a special emphasis on the cryopreservation of viable cells. These cell lines have a broader application, including the potential for genetic rescue and use in species propagation for population enhancement, such as captive breeding and reintroduction programs. We provide an overview of the most commonly used methods for the preservation of genetic resources, identify ways to standardize collection processes across biobanks, and provide decision trees to assist researchers in maximizing the potential use of their samples for both scientific research and the practice of species conservation. We hope that the collection and deposition of tissues preserved using methods that enable eventual cell line establishment will become routine practice among researchers, particularly herpetologists working in the field. While many major museums do not yet cryopreserve reproductive cells or cell lines, they contain the infrastructure and staff to maintain these collections if protocols and procedures are adapted. Collaboration between organizations can play an important future role in the conservation of amphibians, especially biobanks associated with research institutions and those pioneering techniques used in breeding programs.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://amphibian-reptile-conservation.org/pdfs/Volume/Vol_12_no_2/ARC_12_2_[Special_Section]_1-27_e165.pdf
dc.rights© 2018 Zimkus et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be du
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectFROZEN ZOO
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS
dc.subjectAMPHIBIANS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.titleIntegrating current methods for the preservation of amphibian genetic resources and viable tissues to achieve best practices for species conservation
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAmphibian and Reptile Conservation
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage27 (e165)
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
html.description.abstractGlobal amphibian declines associated with anthropogenic causes, climate change, and amphibianspecific infectious diseases (e.g., chytridiomycosis) have highlighted the importance of biobanking amphibian genetic material. Genetic resource collections were the first to centralize the long-term storage of samples for use in basic science, including disciplines such as molecular evolution, molecular genetics, phylogenetics, and systematics. Biobanks associated with conservation breeding programs put a special emphasis on the cryopreservation of viable cells. These cell lines have a broader application, including the potential for genetic rescue and use in species propagation for population enhancement, such as captive breeding and reintroduction programs. We provide an overview of the most commonly used methods for the preservation of genetic resources, identify ways to standardize collection processes across biobanks, and provide decision trees to assist researchers in maximizing the potential use of their samples for both scientific research and the practice of species conservation. We hope that the collection and deposition of tissues preserved using methods that enable eventual cell line establishment will become routine practice among researchers, particularly herpetologists working in the field. While many major museums do not yet cryopreserve reproductive cells or cell lines, they contain the infrastructure and staff to maintain these collections if protocols and procedures are adapted. Collaboration between organizations can play an important future role in the conservation of amphibians, especially biobanks associated with research institutions and those pioneering techniques used in breeding programs.


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© 2018 Zimkus et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be du
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Zimkus et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use for non-commercial and education purposes only, in any medium, provided the original author and the official and authorized publication sources are recognized and properly credited. The official and authorized publication credit sources, which will be du