Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHennessy, Sarah McCullough
dc.contributor.authorMarczak, Susanne A.
dc.contributor.authorNordstrom, Lisa A.
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gecco.2018.e00397
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/151
dc.description.abstractThe California ground squirrel (Otospermophilus beecheyi) is generally undervalued despite serving as an ecosystem engineer in grassland ecosystems. Evidence of significant engineering effects by squirrels indicates that population reductions have cascading effects on other species, including several conservation-dependent species. While the theory and practices behind habitat association studies are already well established, our application of this approach helped identify priority management options in degraded grasslands expected to change further under shifts in climate. In this study we conducted surveys for California ground squirrels throughout San Diego County grasslands and examined habitat covariates to determine the ecological variables currently associated with occurrence. The primary objectives were to 1) improve our understanding of the habitat variables associated with squirrel presence, and 2) develop a predictive model for squirrel habitat suitability at a local scale. The most predictive models included significant main effects for percent sand (as a component of soil texture) and vegetation cover. A 10% increase in vegetation cover was associated with 1.3 fold lower odds of squirrel presence, whereas a 10% increase in percent sand was associated with 2.0 times higher odds of squirrel presence. Comparison of the predictive accuracy of soil texture data at two scales (fine-scale field vs. landscape scale GIS layers) showed fine-scale field sampling has greater predictive strength. Because soil type is a logistically non-malleable factor for wildlife managers, it is important to categorize management sites by soil type to identify the potential for promoting fossorial species on the landscape. With the prospect of shifting landscape ecotones due to climate change, it is as important to understand the basic habitat requirements of keystone species as for rare species.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S235198941830043X
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectSQUIRRELS
dc.subjectCALIFORNIA
dc.subjectGRASSLANDS
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.subjectECOSYSTEMS
dc.titleReconsidering habitat associations in the Anthropocene
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleGlobal Ecology and Conservation
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.beginpagee00397
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T01:33:43Z
html.description.abstractThe California ground squirrel (Otospermophilus beecheyi) is generally undervalued despite serving as an ecosystem engineer in grassland ecosystems. Evidence of significant engineering effects by squirrels indicates that population reductions have cascading effects on other species, including several conservation-dependent species. While the theory and practices behind habitat association studies are already well established, our application of this approach helped identify priority management options in degraded grasslands expected to change further under shifts in climate. In this study we conducted surveys for California ground squirrels throughout San Diego County grasslands and examined habitat covariates to determine the ecological variables currently associated with occurrence. The primary objectives were to 1) improve our understanding of the habitat variables associated with squirrel presence, and 2) develop a predictive model for squirrel habitat suitability at a local scale. The most predictive models included significant main effects for percent sand (as a component of soil texture) and vegetation cover. A 10% increase in vegetation cover was associated with 1.3 fold lower odds of squirrel presence, whereas a 10% increase in percent sand was associated with 2.0 times higher odds of squirrel presence. Comparison of the predictive accuracy of soil texture data at two scales (fine-scale field vs. landscape scale GIS layers) showed fine-scale field sampling has greater predictive strength. Because soil type is a logistically non-malleable factor for wildlife managers, it is important to categorize management sites by soil type to identify the potential for promoting fossorial species on the landscape. With the prospect of shifting landscape ecotones due to climate change, it is as important to understand the basic habitat requirements of keystone species as for rare species.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Hennessey_2018_GlobalEcologyAn ...
Size:
217.6Kb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
Hennessey_2018_GlobalEcologyAn ...
Size:
21.44Kb
Format:
Microsoft Word 2007

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0