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dc.contributor.authorGooley, Rebecca M.
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Carolyn J.
dc.contributor.authorBelov, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorGrueber, Catherine E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40850-017-0026-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/153
dc.description.abstractRetention of genetic diversity and demographic sustainability are the cornerstones of conservation breeding success. In theory, monogamous breeding with equal reproductive output will retain genetic diversity in insurance populations more effectively than group housing which allows mate choice or intrasexual competition. However, the ecological relevance of group housing to a species can outweigh the theoretical benefits of forced monogamy. Here we investigated the influence of different types of captive housing (group (mate choice) versus intensive (forced monogamy)) on reproductive success, litter size and genetic diversity in the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40850-017-0026-x
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Open access. Articles in BMC's journals are published under the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC-BY) to ensure implementation of open access as defined: https://www.biomedcentral.com/about/policies/access-to-articles
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectTASMANIAN DEVILS
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectCOMPETITION
dc.titleThe effects of group versus intensive housing on the retention of genetic diversity in insurance populations
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBMC Zoology
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.beginpage2
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
html.description.abstractRetention of genetic diversity and demographic sustainability are the cornerstones of conservation breeding success. In theory, monogamous breeding with equal reproductive output will retain genetic diversity in insurance populations more effectively than group housing which allows mate choice or intrasexual competition. However, the ecological relevance of group housing to a species can outweigh the theoretical benefits of forced monogamy. Here we investigated the influence of different types of captive housing (group (mate choice) versus intensive (forced monogamy)) on reproductive success, litter size and genetic diversity in the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© The Author(s) 2018. Open access. Articles in BMC's journals are published under the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC-BY) to ensure implementation of open access as defined: https://www.biomedcentral.com/about/policies/access-to-articles
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2018. Open access. Articles in BMC's journals are published under the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC-BY) to ensure implementation of open access as defined: https://www.biomedcentral.com/about/policies/access-to-articles