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dc.contributor.authorWei, Wei
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorDai, Qiang
dc.contributor.authorYang, Zhisong
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Shibin
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorPilfold, Nicholas W.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Xuyu
dc.contributor.authorGu, Xiaodong
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Hong
dc.contributor.authorHan, Han
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jindong
dc.contributor.authorHong, Mingsheng
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zejun
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/conl.12575
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/157
dc.description.abstractLong‐term data on populations, threats, and habitat‐use changes are fundamentally important for conservation policy and management decisions affecting species, but these data are often in short supply. Here, we analyze survey data from 57,087 plots collected in approximately three‐fourths of the giant panda's (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) distributional range during China's national surveys conducted in 1999–2003 and 2011–2014. Pandas associated preferentially with several ecological factors and avoided areas impacted by human activities, such as roads, livestock, mining, and tourism. Promise is shown by dramatic declines in logging rates, but is counterbalanced with recently emerging threats. Pandas have increasingly utilized secondary forest as these forests recovered under protective measures. Pandas have undergone a distributional shift to higher elevations, despite the elevational stability of their bamboo food source, perhaps in response to a similar upward shift in the distribution of livestock. Our findings showcase robust on‐the‐ground data from one of the largest‐scale survey efforts worldwide for an endangered species and highlight how science and policy have contributed to this remarkable success story, and help frame future management strategies.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/conl.12575
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectGIANT PANDAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.titleGiant panda distributional and habitat-use shifts in a changing landscape
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleConservation Letters
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue
dc.source.beginpagee12575
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T01:33:44Z
html.description.abstractLong‐term data on populations, threats, and habitat‐use changes are fundamentally important for conservation policy and management decisions affecting species, but these data are often in short supply. Here, we analyze survey data from 57,087 plots collected in approximately three‐fourths of the giant panda's (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) distributional range during China's national surveys conducted in 1999–2003 and 2011–2014. Pandas associated preferentially with several ecological factors and avoided areas impacted by human activities, such as roads, livestock, mining, and tourism. Promise is shown by dramatic declines in logging rates, but is counterbalanced with recently emerging threats. Pandas have increasingly utilized secondary forest as these forests recovered under protective measures. Pandas have undergone a distributional shift to higher elevations, despite the elevational stability of their bamboo food source, perhaps in response to a similar upward shift in the distribution of livestock. Our findings showcase robust on‐the‐ground data from one of the largest‐scale survey efforts worldwide for an endangered species and highlight how science and policy have contributed to this remarkable success story, and help frame future management strategies.


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CC BY 4.0
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