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dc.contributor.authorKays, Roland
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, James
dc.contributor.authorMclean, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Charlie
dc.contributor.authorPaunescu, Cris
dc.contributor.authorWang, Victor
dc.contributor.authorKravit, Greg
dc.contributor.authorCrofoot, Meg
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T22:27:29Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T22:27:29Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01431161.2018.1523580
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/196
dc.descriptionSummary and promo video link, from James Sheppard: We explore the promise and pitfalls of deploying drone-mounted thermal infrared sensors to detect and monitor animals in the upper canopy of forests. Traditional methods for surveying canopy animal populations are restricted to the ground and involve trained biologists hiking forest paths with binoculars and a clipboard. Drones can cover a much larger area in a short period of time than a biologist and can survey remote areas inaccessible to people. Thermal sensors can also detect the heat signatures of warm blooded animals that can be identified based on their movement patterns and morphometry. Although drones have great potential as an exciting new conservation research tool they do have limitations that must be factored into any drone-based wildlife study, including an inability to detect animals lower in the canopy, range limitations, and the potential for wildlife disturbance. Here is a link to a short YouTube promotional video describing our findings: https://youtu.be/4PvsI_NTu2A
dc.description.abstractAnimals of the rainforest canopies are often endangered by deforestation or hunting but are difficult to survey and study because of the inaccessibility of the treetops, combined with the visual camouflage of many species. Drone-based thermal sensors have the potential to overcome these hurdles by rapidly scanning large forested areas from above, detecting and mapping wildlife based on the contrast between their warm body temperatures and the cool tree canopies....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1080/01431161.2018.1523580
dc.rightsCopyright Taylor & Francis
dc.subjectRAINFORESTS
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.subjectCAMERA TRAPS
dc.relation.youtubehttps://youtu.be/4PvsI_NTu2A
dc.titleHot monkey, cold reality: surveying rainforest canopy mammals using drone-mounted thermal infrared sensors
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Remote Sensing
dc.source.volume40
dc.source.beginpage407
dc.source.endpage419
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
html.description.abstractAnimals of the rainforest canopies are often endangered by deforestation or hunting but are difficult to survey and study because of the inaccessibility of the treetops, combined with the visual camouflage of many species. Drone-based thermal sensors have the potential to overcome these hurdles by rapidly scanning large forested areas from above, detecting and mapping wildlife based on the contrast between their warm body temperatures and the cool tree canopies....


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  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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