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dc.contributor.authorFarquharson, Katherine A.
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Carolyn J.
dc.contributor.authorGrueber, Catherine E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T23:05:26Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T23:05:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-018-03500-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/206
dc.description.abstractSuccessfully establishing captive breeding programs is a priority across diverse industries to address food security, demand for ethical laboratory research animals, and prevent extinction. Differences in reproductive success due to birth origin may threaten the long-term sustainability of captive breeding. Our meta-analysis examining 115 effect sizes from 44 species of invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals shows that, overall, captive-born animals have a 42% decreased odds of reproductive success in captivity compared to their wild-born counterparts. The largest effects are seen in commercial aquaculture, relative to conservation or laboratory settings, and offspring survival and offspring quality were the most sensitive traits. Although a somewhat weaker trend, reproductive success in conservation and laboratory research breeding programs is also in a negative direction for captive-born animals. Our study provides the foundation for future investigation of non-genetic and genetic drivers of change in captivity, and reveals areas for the urgent improvement of captive breeding.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03500-9
dc.rights2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectWILD ANIMALS
dc.subjectREPRODUCTION
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.titleA meta-analysis of birth-origin effects on reproduction in diverse captive environments
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleNature Communications
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.beginpage1055
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T23:17:05Z
html.description.abstractSuccessfully establishing captive breeding programs is a priority across diverse industries to address food security, demand for ethical laboratory research animals, and prevent extinction. Differences in reproductive success due to birth origin may threaten the long-term sustainability of captive breeding. Our meta-analysis examining 115 effect sizes from 44 species of invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals shows that, overall, captive-born animals have a 42% decreased odds of reproductive success in captivity compared to their wild-born counterparts. The largest effects are seen in commercial aquaculture, relative to conservation or laboratory settings, and offspring survival and offspring quality were the most sensitive traits. Although a somewhat weaker trend, reproductive success in conservation and laboratory research breeding programs is also in a negative direction for captive-born animals. Our study provides the foundation for future investigation of non-genetic and genetic drivers of change in captivity, and reveals areas for the urgent improvement of captive breeding.


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2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.  You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.