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dc.contributor.authorGoldenberg, Shifra Z.
dc.contributor.authorWittemyer, George
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-15T19:09:05Z
dc.date.available2020-05-15T19:09:05Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10329-019-00766-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/215
dc.description.abstractMany nonhuman animals have been documented to take an interest in their dead. A few socially complex and cognitively advanced taxa—primates, cetaceans, and proboscideans—stand out for the range and duration of behaviors that they display at conspecific carcasses....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10329-019-00766-5
dc.rightsSpringer Nature
dc.subjectSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectAFRICAN ELEPHANTS
dc.subjectEAST AFRICA
dc.subjectNATURE RESERVES
dc.subjectDEATH
dc.titleElephant behavior toward the dead: A review and insights from field observations
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePrimates
dc.source.volume61
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage119
dc.source.endpage128
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractMany nonhuman animals have been documented to take an interest in their dead. A few socially complex and cognitively advanced taxa—primates, cetaceans, and proboscideans—stand out for the range and duration of behaviors that they display at conspecific carcasses....


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  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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