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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Elizabeth Oneita
dc.contributor.authorWillemsen, Madelon
dc.contributor.authorDang, Vinh
dc.contributor.authorO’Connor, David
dc.contributor.authorGlikman, Jenny A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-15T19:09:05Z
dc.date.available2020-05-15T19:09:05Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gecco.2020.e00960
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/217
dc.description.abstractTigers are indisputably in danger of extinction due to habitat loss and demand for their parts. Tigers are extirpated in the wild from every country bar one in mainland East and Southeast Asia. Although consumption of tiger products is known to be established in China, less is known about demand for tiger products in Southeast Asia. In this study, we investigate tiger product demand in Vietnam, a major illegal wildlife consumer country. There has been little research into consumption, in particular the level of use, the products being consumed, variation in use of products between areas, and the motivations of consuming tiger products. Through a quantitative survey of 1120 individuals, we show that use of tiger products could be as high as ~11% of the sample in both urban centers of Vietnam, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. Tiger bone glue is the predominant product used, for medicinal purposes. In Hanoi, it is generally purchased by the individual for self-use, while in Ho Chi Minh City it is generally purchased as a gift. In both cities, individuals were generally highly satisfied with the product, indicating entrenched belief in efficacy among consumers. Ultimately, our results show that tiger product use is relatively pervasive. We suggest that conservation organizations should focus on behavior change campaigns that are informed by the results here, and that are specific to each area and to the specific use of tiger product glue for medicine. By reducing demand, beleaguered tiger populations will have a greater chance of stabilization and eventual growth.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2351989419307449
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4. 0/).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectTIGERS
dc.subjectVIETNAM
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CRIME
dc.subjectWILDLIFE TRADE
dc.titleAn updated analysis of the consumption of tiger products in urban Vietnam
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleGlobal Ecology and Conservation
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.beginpagee00960
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-19T18:39:21Z
html.description.abstractTigers are indisputably in danger of extinction due to habitat loss and demand for their parts. Tigers are extirpated in the wild from every country bar one in mainland East and Southeast Asia. Although consumption of tiger products is known to be established in China, less is known about demand for tiger products in Southeast Asia. In this study, we investigate tiger product demand in Vietnam, a major illegal wildlife consumer country. There has been little research into consumption, in particular the level of use, the products being consumed, variation in use of products between areas, and the motivations of consuming tiger products. Through a quantitative survey of 1120 individuals, we show that use of tiger products could be as high as ~11% of the sample in both urban centers of Vietnam, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. Tiger bone glue is the predominant product used, for medicinal purposes. In Hanoi, it is generally purchased by the individual for self-use, while in Ho Chi Minh City it is generally purchased as a gift. In both cities, individuals were generally highly satisfied with the product, indicating entrenched belief in efficacy among consumers. Ultimately, our results show that tiger product use is relatively pervasive. We suggest that conservation organizations should focus on behavior change campaigns that are informed by the results here, and that are specific to each area and to the specific use of tiger product glue for medicine. By reducing demand, beleaguered tiger populations will have a greater chance of stabilization and eventual growth.


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© 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4. 0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4. 0/).