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dc.contributor.authorIbarguchi, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorRajdev, Vinay
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Maribeth S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-20T17:23:24Z
dc.date.available2020-05-20T17:23:24Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.eissn1751-8369
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17518369.2018.1540242
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/17518369.2018.1540242
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/235
dc.description.abstractArctic environmental changes already impact regional ecosystems, economies and northerncommunities, and are having increasing influence on many aspects of the global system.Interest in the Arctic has increased in concert with our improved awareness of potentialchanges; however, research funding has not necessarily kept pace with the need to improveour understanding of Arctic system change to inform evidence-based decision making.Analyses of data on research funding trends (2003–14) in Canada, the USA and the EUindicate that less than 3% of the total budget the funding agencies considered is allocatedin any given year to Arctic-related research. Furthermore, alignment is uneven amongestablished scientific research priorities, existing societal needs and projects awarded fund-ing. New support mechanisms and improved alignment among resources, expertise andpriorities, including Indigenous research priorities, are vital to planning and adaptation inthe face of ongoing Arctic change.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorwegian Polar Instituteen_US
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/),which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectARCTICen_US
dc.subjectRESEARCHen_US
dc.subjectECONOMICSen_US
dc.subjectCLIMATE CHANGEen_US
dc.subjectECOSYSTEMSen_US
dc.titleAre current research funding structures sufficient to address rapid Arctic change in a meaningful way?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePolar Researchen_US
dc.source.volume37en_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.source.beginpage1540242en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-20T17:23:24Z
html.description.abstractArctic environmental changes already impact regional ecosystems, economies and northerncommunities, and are having increasing influence on many aspects of the global system.Interest in the Arctic has increased in concert with our improved awareness of potentialchanges; however, research funding has not necessarily kept pace with the need to improveour understanding of Arctic system change to inform evidence-based decision making.Analyses of data on research funding trends (2003–14) in Canada, the USA and the EUindicate that less than 3% of the total budget the funding agencies considered is allocatedin any given year to Arctic-related research. Furthermore, alignment is uneven amongestablished scientific research priorities, existing societal needs and projects awarded fund-ing. New support mechanisms and improved alignment among resources, expertise andpriorities, including Indigenous research priorities, are vital to planning and adaptation inthe face of ongoing Arctic change.en_US


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© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/),which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/),which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.