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dc.contributor.authorPreece, Daryl
dc.contributor.authorChow, Kay W.
dc.contributor.authorGomez-Godinez, Veronica
dc.contributor.authorGustafson, Kyle
dc.contributor.authorEsener, Selin
dc.contributor.authorRavida, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorDurrant, Barbara S.
dc.contributor.authorBerns, Michael W.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T22:44:05Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T22:44:05Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep46480
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/245
dc.description.abstractThe ability to successfully fertilize ova relies upon the swimming ability of spermatozoa. Both in humans and in animals, sperm motility has been used as a metric for the viability of semen samples. Recently, several studies have examined the efficacy of low dosage red light exposure for cellular repair and increasing sperm motility. Of prime importance to the practical application of this technique is the absence of DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. In this study, we examine the effect of 633 nm coherent, red laser light on sperm motility using a novel wavelet-based algorithm that allows for direct measurement of curvilinear velocity under red light illumination. This new algorithm gives results comparable to the standard computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. We then assess the safety of red light treatment of sperm by analyzing, (1) the levels of double-strand breaks in the DNA, and (2) oxidative damage in the sperm DNA. The results demonstrate that for the parameters used there are insignificant differences in oxidative DNA damage as a result of irradiation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/srep46480
dc.rights(c)2017 Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSPERM
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titleRed light improves spermatozoa motility and does not induce oxidative DNA damage
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleScientific Reports
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.beginpage46480
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T22:44:05Z
html.description.abstractThe ability to successfully fertilize ova relies upon the swimming ability of spermatozoa. Both in humans and in animals, sperm motility has been used as a metric for the viability of semen samples. Recently, several studies have examined the efficacy of low dosage red light exposure for cellular repair and increasing sperm motility. Of prime importance to the practical application of this technique is the absence of DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. In this study, we examine the effect of 633 nm coherent, red laser light on sperm motility using a novel wavelet-based algorithm that allows for direct measurement of curvilinear velocity under red light illumination. This new algorithm gives results comparable to the standard computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. We then assess the safety of red light treatment of sperm by analyzing, (1) the levels of double-strand breaks in the DNA, and (2) oxidative damage in the sperm DNA. The results demonstrate that for the parameters used there are insignificant differences in oxidative DNA damage as a result of irradiation.


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(c)2017 Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.  You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as (c)2017 Nature Publishing Group. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC BY license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. You are not required to obtain permission to reuse this article.