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dc.contributor.authorMaschinski, Joyce
dc.contributor.authorAlbrecht, Matthew A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T22:44:06Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T22:44:06Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier2468-2659
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pld.2017.09.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/250
dc.description.abstractRecent estimates indicate that one-fifth of botanical species worldwide are considered at risk of becoming extinct in the wild. One available strategy for conserving many rare plant species is reintroduction, which holds much promise especially when carefully planned by following guidelines and when monitored long-term. We review the Center for Plant Conservation Best Reintroduction Practice Guidelines and highlight important components for planning plant reintroductions. Before attempting reintroductions practitioners should justify them, should consider alternative conservation strategies, understand threats, and ensure that these threats are absent from any recipient site. Planning a reintroduction requires considering legal and logistic parameters as well as target species and recipient site attributes. Carefully selecting the genetic composition of founders, founder population size, and recipient site will influence establishment and population growth. Whenever possible practitioners should conduct reintroductions as experiments and publish results. To document whether populations are sustainable will require long-term monitoring for decades, therefore planning an appropriate monitoring technique for the taxon must consider current and future needs. Botanical gardens can play a leading role in developing the science and practice of plant reintroduction.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468265917300987
dc.rightsOpen Access funded by Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, under a Creative Commons license (copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format): https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectPLANT CONSERVATION
dc.subjectREINTRODUCTION
dc.subjectGENETICS
dc.subjectGUIDELINES
dc.titleCenter for Plant Conservation's Best Practice Guidelines for the reintroduction of rare plants
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePlant Diversity
dc.source.volume39
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage390
dc.source.endpage395
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T22:44:06Z
html.description.abstractRecent estimates indicate that one-fifth of botanical species worldwide are considered at risk of becoming extinct in the wild. One available strategy for conserving many rare plant species is reintroduction, which holds much promise especially when carefully planned by following guidelines and when monitored long-term. We review the Center for Plant Conservation Best Reintroduction Practice Guidelines and highlight important components for planning plant reintroductions. Before attempting reintroductions practitioners should justify them, should consider alternative conservation strategies, understand threats, and ensure that these threats are absent from any recipient site. Planning a reintroduction requires considering legal and logistic parameters as well as target species and recipient site attributes. Carefully selecting the genetic composition of founders, founder population size, and recipient site will influence establishment and population growth. Whenever possible practitioners should conduct reintroductions as experiments and publish results. To document whether populations are sustainable will require long-term monitoring for decades, therefore planning an appropriate monitoring technique for the taxon must consider current and future needs. Botanical gardens can play a leading role in developing the science and practice of plant reintroduction.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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Open Access funded by Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, under a Creative Commons license (copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format): https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Open Access funded by Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, under a Creative Commons license (copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format): https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/