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dc.contributor.authorVan der Weyde, Leanne K.
dc.contributor.authorHubel, T. Y.
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, J.
dc.contributor.authorShotton, J.
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, R.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, A. M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T22:44:06Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T22:44:06Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier2046-6390
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/bio.021055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/251
dc.description.abstractBotswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bio.biologists.org/content/6/1/118
dc.rights© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectCHEETAHS
dc.subjectSOUTHERN AFRICA
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.titleMovement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in farmlands in Botswana
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBiology Open
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage118
dc.source.endpage124
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
html.description.abstractBotswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict.


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© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.