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dc.contributor.authorGrueber, Catherine E.
dc.contributor.authorReid-Wainscoat, Elizabeth E.
dc.contributor.authorFox, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorBelov, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorShier, Debra M.
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Carolyn J.
dc.contributor.authorPemberton, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-02273-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/253
dc.description.abstractCaptive breeding of threatened species, for release to the wild, is critical for conservation. This strategy, however, risks producing captive-raised animals with traits poorly suited to the wild. We describe the first study to characterise accumulated consequences of long-term captive breeding on behaviour, by following the release of Tasmanian devils to the wild. We test the impact of prolonged captive breeding on the probability that captive-raised animals are fatally struck by vehicles. Multiple generations of captive breeding increased the probability that individuals were fatally struck, a pattern that could not be explained by other confounding factors (e.g. age or release site). Our results imply that long-term captive breeding programs may produce animals that are naïve to the risks of the post-release environment. Our analyses have already induced changes in management policy of this endangered species, and serve as model of productive synergy between ecological monitoring and conservation strategy.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-02273-3
dc.rights2017 The Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectTASMANIAN DEVILS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.titleIncreasing generations in captivity is associated with increased vulnerability of Tasmanian devils to vehicle strike following release to the wild
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleScientific Reports
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage2161
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
html.description.abstractCaptive breeding of threatened species, for release to the wild, is critical for conservation. This strategy, however, risks producing captive-raised animals with traits poorly suited to the wild. We describe the first study to characterise accumulated consequences of long-term captive breeding on behaviour, by following the release of Tasmanian devils to the wild. We test the impact of prolonged captive breeding on the probability that captive-raised animals are fatally struck by vehicles. Multiple generations of captive breeding increased the probability that individuals were fatally struck, a pattern that could not be explained by other confounding factors (e.g. age or release site). Our results imply that long-term captive breeding programs may produce animals that are naïve to the risks of the post-release environment. Our analyses have already induced changes in management policy of this endangered species, and serve as model of productive synergy between ecological monitoring and conservation strategy.


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2017 The Author(s).  Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as 2017 The Author(s). Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.