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dc.contributor.authorWilloughby, Janna R.
dc.contributor.authorIvy, Jamie A.
dc.contributor.authorLacy, Robert C.
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Jacqueline M.
dc.contributor.authorDeWoody, J. Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0175996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/254
dc.description.abstractCaptive breeding programs are often initiated to prevent species extinction until reintroduction into the wild can occur. However, the evolution of captive populations via inbreeding, drift, and selection can impair fitness, compromising reintroduction programs. To better understand the evolutionary response of species bred in captivity, we used nearly 5500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in populations of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to measure the impact of breeding regimes on genomic diversity. We bred mice in captivity for 20 generations using two replicates of three protocols: random mating (RAN), selection for docile behaviors (DOC), and minimizing mean kinship (MK). The MK protocol most effectively retained genomic diversity and reduced the effects of selection. Additionally, genomic diversity was significantly related to fitness, as assessed with pedigrees and SNPs supported with genomic sequence data. Because captive-born individuals are often less fit in wild settings compared to wild-born individuals, captive-estimated fitness correlations likely underestimate the effects in wild populations. Therefore, minimizing inbreeding and selection in captive populations is critical to increasing the probability of releasing fit individuals into the wild.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0175996
dc.rightsPLOS applies the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license to works we publish. This license was developed to facilitate Open Access—namely, free immediate access to, and unrestricted reuse of, original works of all types. Under this license, authors agree to make articles legally available for reuse, without permission or fees, for virtually any purpose. Anyone may copy, distribute or reuse these articles, as long as the author and original source are properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectINBREEDING
dc.subjectPOPULATION GENETICS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectNATURAL SELECTION
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titleInbreeding and selection shape genomic diversity in captive populations: Implications for the conservation of endangered species
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS ONE
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpagee0175996
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-27T22:44:07Z
html.description.abstractCaptive breeding programs are often initiated to prevent species extinction until reintroduction into the wild can occur. However, the evolution of captive populations via inbreeding, drift, and selection can impair fitness, compromising reintroduction programs. To better understand the evolutionary response of species bred in captivity, we used nearly 5500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in populations of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to measure the impact of breeding regimes on genomic diversity. We bred mice in captivity for 20 generations using two replicates of three protocols: random mating (RAN), selection for docile behaviors (DOC), and minimizing mean kinship (MK). The MK protocol most effectively retained genomic diversity and reduced the effects of selection. Additionally, genomic diversity was significantly related to fitness, as assessed with pedigrees and SNPs supported with genomic sequence data. Because captive-born individuals are often less fit in wild settings compared to wild-born individuals, captive-estimated fitness correlations likely underestimate the effects in wild populations. Therefore, minimizing inbreeding and selection in captive populations is critical to increasing the probability of releasing fit individuals into the wild.


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PLOS applies the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license to works we publish. This license was developed to facilitate Open Access—namely, free immediate access to, and unrestricted reuse of, original works of all types. Under this license, authors agree to make articles legally available for reuse, without permission or fees, for virtually any purpose. Anyone may copy, distribute or reuse these articles, as long as the author and original source are properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as PLOS applies the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license to works we publish. This license was developed to facilitate Open Access—namely, free immediate access to, and unrestricted reuse of, original works of all types. Under this license, authors agree to make articles legally available for reuse, without permission or fees, for virtually any purpose. Anyone may copy, distribute or reuse these articles, as long as the author and original source are properly cited.