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dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, Daniel T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-27T23:20:50Z
dc.date.available2020-05-27T23:20:50Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier1749-4877
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1749-4877.12235
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/269
dc.description.abstractSurvival and successful reproduction require animals to make critical decisions amidst a naturally dynamic environmental and social background (i.e. “context”). However, human activities have pervasively, and rapidly, extended contextual variation into evolutionarily novel territory, potentially rendering evolved animal decision-making mechanisms and strategies maladaptive. We suggest that explicitly focusing on animal decision-making (ADM), by integrating and applying findings from studies of sensory ecology, cognitive psychology, behavioral economics and eco-evolutionary strategies, may enhance our understanding of, and our ability to predict how, human-driven changes in the environment and population demography will influence animal populations. Fundamentally, the decisions animals make involve evolved mechanisms, and behaviors emerge from the combined action of sensory integration, cognitive mechanisms and strategic rules of thumb, and any of these processes may have a disproportionate influence on behavior. Although there is extensive literature exploring ADM, it generally reflects a canalized, discipline-specific approach that lacks a unified conceptual framework. As a result, there has been limited application of ADM theory and research findings into predictive models that can enhance management outcomes, even though it is likely that the relative resilience of species to rapid environmental change is fundamentally a result of how ADM is linked to contextual variation. Here, we focus on how context influences ADM, and highlight ideas and results that may be most applicable to conservation biology.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1749-4877.12235/abstract
dc.rights© 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectPOLAR BEARS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.titleContextual influences on animal decision-making: Significance for behavior-based wildlife conservation and management
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleIntegrative Zoology
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage32
dc.source.endpage48
dcterms.dateAccepted2017
html.description.abstractSurvival and successful reproduction require animals to make critical decisions amidst a naturally dynamic environmental and social background (i.e. “context”). However, human activities have pervasively, and rapidly, extended contextual variation into evolutionarily novel territory, potentially rendering evolved animal decision-making mechanisms and strategies maladaptive. We suggest that explicitly focusing on animal decision-making (ADM), by integrating and applying findings from studies of sensory ecology, cognitive psychology, behavioral economics and eco-evolutionary strategies, may enhance our understanding of, and our ability to predict how, human-driven changes in the environment and population demography will influence animal populations. Fundamentally, the decisions animals make involve evolved mechanisms, and behaviors emerge from the combined action of sensory integration, cognitive mechanisms and strategic rules of thumb, and any of these processes may have a disproportionate influence on behavior. Although there is extensive literature exploring ADM, it generally reflects a canalized, discipline-specific approach that lacks a unified conceptual framework. As a result, there has been limited application of ADM theory and research findings into predictive models that can enhance management outcomes, even though it is likely that the relative resilience of species to rapid environmental change is fundamentally a result of how ADM is linked to contextual variation. Here, we focus on how context influences ADM, and highlight ideas and results that may be most applicable to conservation biology.


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  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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