• An enigmatic mortality event in the only population of the Critically Endangered Cameroonian frog Xenopus longipes

      Blackburn, David C.; Evans, Ben J.; Pessier, Allan P.; Vredenburg, Vance T.; (2010)
      Contemporary global declines and mortality events in amphibian populations have been often attributed to infectious disease and climate change, separately and in combination. We report on an enigmatic mortality event in the only known population of the Critically Endangered frog species Xenopus longipes....
    • Attempted Predation by Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) on Preuss's Red Colobus (Procolobus preussi) in the Ebo Forest, Cameroon

      Morgan, Bethan J.; Suh, J.N.; Abwe, Ekwoge E. (2012)
      We describe the first observation of a predation attempt by Nigerian-Cameroon chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) on Preuss’s red colobus (Procolobus preussi) in the Ebo forest, Cameroon. The activity, which was observed for 15 min, primarily involved 1 chimpanzee and 1 red colobus individual, with a further 2 chimpanzees observing the event....
    • Elephants of south-east Angola in war and peace: their decline, re-colonization and recent status: Elephants in war and peace in SE Angola

      Chase, Michael J.; Griffin, Curtice R. (2011)
      ...the full impact of the civil war on elephants is uncertain because there are no reliable estimates of Angolan elephant populations. Following the end of the civil war in 2002, our three aerial surveys of Luiana PR indicated that elephant numbers are increasing rapidly, from 366 in January 2004 to 1827 in November 2005, and expanding their range in the Reserve....
    • Genetic signatures of a demographic collapse in a large-bodied forest dwelling primate (Mandrillus leucophaeus)

      Ting, Nelson; Astaras, Christos; Hearn, Gail; Honarvar, Shaya; Corush, Joel; Burrell, Andrew S.; Phillips, Naomi; Morgan, Bethan J.; Gadsby, Elizabeth L.; Raaum, Ryan; et al. (2012)
      It is difficult to predict how current climate change will affect wildlife species adapted to a tropical rainforest environment. Understanding how population dynamics fluctuated in such species throughout periods of past climatic change can provide insight into this issue. The drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) is a large-bodied rainforest adapted mammal found in West Central Africa. In the middle of this endangered monkey's geographic range is Lake Barombi Mbo, which has a well-documented palynological record of environmental change that dates to the Late Pleistocene. We used a Bayesian coalescent-based framework to analyze 2,076 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA across wild drill populations to infer past changes in female effective population size since the Late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the drill underwent a nearly 15-fold demographic collapse in female effective population size that was most prominent during the Mid Holocene (approximately 3-5 Ka). This time period coincides with a period of increased dryness and seasonality across Africa and a dramatic reduction in forest coverage at Lake Barombi Mbo. We believe that these changes in climate and forest coverage were the driving forces behind the drill population decline. Furthermore, the warm temperatures and increased aridity of the Mid Holocene are potentially analogous to current and future conditions faced by many tropical rainforest communities. In order to prevent future declines in population size in rainforest-adapted species such as the drill, large tracts of forest should be protected to both preserve habitat and prevent forest loss through aridification.
    • Notes from the field: A primatologist's point of view

      Morgan, Bethan J. (2012)
      What's a regular day in the life of a field primatologist? Working in the tropics is perceived as difficult and dangerous, with scientific discoveries only part of the everyday drama of studying primates....
    • Obituary to Kupe Cowboy

      Morgan, Bethan J. (2020)
      Simon ‘Kupe’ Ngwese, better known as ‘Kupe Cowboy’, lived a full life. Born in around 1940, to a poor family in Kupe village, near Tombel, Kupe-Muanenguba division of South West Region, Cameroon, like many around him he grew up as a farmer and opportunistic hunter. Later in life, he worked as a research assistant to the then San Diego Zoo Global project at Mount Kupe in Bakossiland....
    • Regional Action Plan for the Conservation of the Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti)

      Morgan, Bethan J.; Adeleke, Alade; Bassey, Tony; Bergl, Richard; Dunn, Andrew; Fotso, Roger; Gadsby, Elizabeth; Gonder, Mary Katherine; Greengrass, Elisabeth; Koulagna, Denis Koutou; et al. (IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group and Zoological Society of San Diego, 2011)
      This document represents the consensus of views from forestry and wildlife conservation agencies in Nigeria and Cameroon, local and international nongovernmental conservation organizations, and university-based researchers who met at a series of workshops in Cameroon and Nigeria to formulate a set of actions that, if implemented, will increase the long-term survival prospects of the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee.
    • Regional Action Plan for the Conservation of the Nigeria–Cameroon Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti)

      Morgan, Bethan J.; Adeleke, Alade; Bassey, Tony; Bergl, Richard; Dunn, Andrew; Fotso, Roger; Gadsby, Elizabeth; Gonder, Mary Katherine; Greengrass, Elisabeth; Koulagna, Denis Koutou; et al. (IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group and Zoological Society of San Diego, 2011)
      This document represents the consensus of views from forestry and wildlife conservation agencies in Nigeria and Cameroon, local and international nongovernmental conservation organizations, and university-based researchers who met at a series of workshops in Cameroon and Nigeria to formulate a set of actions that, if implemented, will increase the longterm survival prospects of the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes ellioti. The Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee is the most endangered of all currently recognized chimpanzee subspecies, with a total remaining population of between 3,500 and 9,000 living in forested habitat to the north of the Sanaga River in Cameroon, the eastern edge of Nigeria, and in forest fragments in the Niger Delta and southwestern Nigeria
    • The gorillas of the Ebo Forest, Cameroon

      Morgan, Bethan J.; (2010)
      Cameroon is an important country for both gorillas and chimpanzees. To the south of the Sanaga River, western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) exist, often sympatrically with central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). To the forested region northwest of the Sanaga River the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes vellerosus) is present (Gonder et al. 1997), as well as a small remnant population of Cross River gorillas (Gorilla gorilla diehli) peppered along the Cameroon-Nigerian border area (Morgan & Sunderland-Groves 2004)....