• Abomasal impaction in captive bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus)

      Gyimesi, Zoltan S.; Burns, Roy B.; Campbell, Mark; Knightly, Felicia; Kramer, Lynn W.; Wack, Raymund F.; Zuba, Jeffery R.; Rings, D. Michael (2011)
      Fatal abomasal impaction, often combined with omasal impaction, was diagnosed in 11 bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus) from five different zoologic collections in the United States between 1981 and 2009. Nine of 11 cases occurred in young females (10 mo–7 yr old) and typical clinical signs prior to diagnosis or death included partial or complete anorexia, dehydration, and scant fecal production....
    • An enigmatic mortality event in the only population of the Critically Endangered Cameroonian frog Xenopus longipes

      Blackburn, David C.; Evans, Ben J.; Pessier, Allan P.; Vredenburg, Vance T.; (2010)
      Contemporary global declines and mortality events in amphibian populations have been often attributed to infectious disease and climate change, separately and in combination. We report on an enigmatic mortality event in the only known population of the Critically Endangered frog species Xenopus longipes....
    • Disorders of nondomestic mammals

      Rideout, Bruce; Njaa, Bradley L. (John Wiley & Sons, 2012)
      Kirkbride's Diagnosis of Abortion and Neonatal Loss in Animals, Fourth Edition is a concise resource for determining the causes of abortion and neonatal loss in cattle, small ruminants, pigs, horses, dogs, cats, and exotic mammals…. Covers cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, dogs, cats, and non-domestic mammals Details the characteristics of many abortifacient causes and associated lesions….
    • Disseminated coccidoidomycosis in a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

      Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Stalis, Ilse H.; Pye, Geoffrey W. (2012)
      A16-yr-old male koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented for nonspecific signs of illness and weight loss. Despite 2 mo of diagnostics and supportive care, the koala's health declined and euthanasia was elected....
    • Efforts to restore the California condor to the wild

      Wallace, Michael P. (2012)
      By the early 1980s new studies using radio telemetry and moult patterns to identify individuals indicated that only 21 California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) existed, with five pairs sporadically breeding. With continuous and poorly understood mortality, the decision was made to capture the remaining animals and in 1987 all 27 birds were placed in the protective custody of the San Diego and Los Angeles zoos, at which time the species was considered Extinct in the Wild....
    • Evaluating potential effects of solar power facilities on wildlife from an animal behavior perspective

      Chock, Rachel Y.; Clucas, Barbara; Peterson, Elizabeth K.; Blackwell, Bradley F.; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Church, Kathleen; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; Francescoli, Gabriel; Greggor, Alison L.; Kemp, Paul; et al. (2021)
      Solar power is a renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. However, research is scarce on how solar facilities affect wildlife. With input from professionals in ecology, conservation, and energy, we conducted a research-prioritization process and identified key questions needed to better understand impacts of solar facilities on wildlife. We focused on animal behavior, which can be used to identify population responses before mortality or other fitness consequences are documented. Behavioral studies can also offer approaches to understand the mechanisms leading to negative interactions (e.g., collision, singeing, avoidance) and provide insight into mitigating effects. Here, we review how behavioral responses to solar facilities, including perception, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions are priority research areas. Addressing these themes will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of solar power on wildlife and guide future mitigation.
    • Guidelines for large herbivore translocation simplified: black rhinoceros case study

      Linklater, Wayne L.; Adcock, K.; du Preez, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Law, P. R.; Knight, M. H.; Gedir, J. V.; Kerley, G. I. H. (2011)
      ...We apply a 25‐year (1981–2005) data base including 89 reintroduction and 102 restocking events that released 682 black rhinoceros Diceros bicornis into 81 reserves to test 24 hypotheses for translocation success, defined as survival to 1 year post‐release. We made information‐theoretic comparisons of hypotheses represented as hierarchical models incorporating random effects for reserve and release cohort predictors of death....
    • Patterns of mortality in free-ranging California condors (Gymnogyps californianus)

      Rideout, Bruce; Stalis, Ilse H.; Papendick, Rebecca; Pessier, Alan P.; Puschner, B.; Finkelstien, M.E.; Smith, D.R.; Johnson, M.; Mace, Michael E.; Stroud, R.; et al. (2012)
      We document causes of death in free-ranging California Condors (Gymnogyps californianus) from the inception of the reintroduction program in 1992 through December 2009 to identify current and historic mortality factors that might interfere with establishment of self-sustaining populations in the wild. A total of 135 deaths occurred from October 1992 (the first post-release death) through December 2009, from a maximum population-at-risk of 352 birds, for a cumulative crude mortality rate of 38%. A definitive cause of death was determined for 76 of the 98 submitted cases, 70%(53/76) of which were attributed to anthropogenic causes. Trash ingestion was the most important mortality factor in nestlings (proportional mortality rate [PMR] 73%; 8/11), while lead toxicosis was the most important factor in juveniles (PMR 26%; 13/50) and adults (PMR 67%; 10/15). These results demonstrate that the leading causes of death at all California Condor release sites are anthropogenic. The mortality factors thought to be important in the decline of the historic California Condor population, particularly lead poisoning, remain the most important documented mortality factors today. Without effective mitigation, these factors can be expected to have the same effects on the sustainability of the wild populations as they have in the past.
    • Survey for the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Southwestern North Carolina salamander populations

      Keitzer, S. Conor; Goforth, Reuben; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, April J. (2011)
      Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a fungal pathogen responsible for a potentially fatal disease of amphibians. We conducted a survey for B. dendrobatidis in the Appalachian Mountains of southwestern North Carolina, USA, from 10 June to 23 July 23 2009....