• A massively parallel sequencing approach uncovers ancient origins and high genetic variability of endangered Przewalski's horses

      Goto, Hiroki; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fisher, Allison R.; Schultz, Bryant; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D. (2011)
      The endangered Przewalski's horse is the closest relative of the domestic horse and is the only true wild horse species surviving today. The question of whether Przewalski's horse is the direct progenitor of domestic horse has been hotly debated. Studies of DNA diversity within Przewalski's horses have been sparse but are urgently needed to ensure their successful reintroduction to the wild. In an attempt to resolve the controversy surrounding the phylogenetic position and genetic diversity of Przewalski's horses, we used massively parallel sequencing technology to decipher the complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for all four surviving maternal lineages of Przewalski's horses. Unlike single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing usually affected by ascertainment bias, the present method is expected to be largely unbiased. Three mitochondrial haplotypes were discovered—two similar ones, haplotypes I/II, and one substantially divergent from the other two, haplotype III. Haplotypes I/II versus III did not cluster together on a phylogenetic tree, rejecting the monophyly of Przewalski's horse maternal lineages, and were estimated to split 0.117–0.186 Ma, significantly preceding horse domestication. In the phylogeny based on autosomal sequences, Przewalski's horses formed a monophyletic clade, separate from the Thoroughbred domestic horse lineage. Our results suggest that Przewalski's horses have ancient origins and are not the direct progenitors of domestic horses. The analysis of the vast amount of sequence data presented here suggests that Przewalski's and domestic horse lineages diverged at least 0.117 Ma but since then have retained ancestral genetic polymorphism and/or experienced gene flow.
    • Characterization of cultured adult Corturnix japonica testicular germ stem cells using seven stem cell markers.

      Jensen, Thomas; Poling, Matthew; Charter, Suellen; Durrant, Barbara S.; (2010)
      ...The large avian oocyte and the inability to consistently superovulate birds make techniques such as cloning and oocyte cryopreservation unlikely tools for avian conservation. Instead, the use of domestic birds as hosts to produce sperm of exotic species for use in artificial insemination may be a practical approach to conserve avian germplasm....
    • Disorders of sexual development in wild and captive exotic animals

      Mastromonaco, G. F.; Houck, Marlys L.; Bergfelt, D. R. (2012)
      ...Compared to the wealth of information available on humans and domestic species, a better understanding of the factors influencing sexual development in wildlife is essential for developing and improving population management or conservation plans. This review attempts to bring together the different facets of DSDs as studied in the fields of reproductive physiology, endocrinology, ecotoxicology, wildlife biology, and environmental health.
    • Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in 3 wildlife species, San Diego, California, USA

      Schrenzel, Mark D.; Tucker, Tammy A.; Stalis, Ilse H.; Kagan, Rebecca A.; Burns, Russell P.; Denison, Amy M.; Drew, Clifton P.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Rideout, Bruce (2011)
      The influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus rapidly created a global pandemic among humans and also appears to have strong infectivity for a broad range of animal species (1–3). The virus has been found repeatedly in swine and has been detected in a dog, cats, turkeys, and domestic ferrets and in nondomestic animals, including skunks, cheetahs, and giant anteaters (2–4). In some cases, animal-to-animal transmission may have occurred, raising concern about the development of new wildlife reservoirs. In 2009, the first recognized occurrence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in southern California in April was followed by a surge of cases during October through November (4). During this time, respiratory illness developed in a 12-year-old male American badger (Taxidea taxus taxus), a 19-year-old female Bornean binturong (Arctictis binturong penicillatus), and a 7-year-old black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) housed in a San Diego zoological garden....