• Assessing potential impacts of solar power facilities on wildlife utilizing animal behavior research

      Chock, Rachel Y.; Clucas, B.; Peterson, E.K.; Blackwell, B.F.; Blumstein, D.T.; Church, K.; Fernández-Juricic, E.; Francescoli, G.; Greggor, A.L.; Kemp, P.; et al. (Virtual, 2021)
      Utility-scale solar power is a rapidly expanding renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands. Solar facilities have large footprints across previously undeveloped habitat, particularly the American Southwest. Despite the scale of this industry, research is scarce on how construction and operation of facilities affect wildlife. We conducted a research-prioritization process to identify key questions to better understand how wildlife is affected by solar facilities and how behavioral data can be used to mitigate negative impacts. Behavioral responses are often the most visible signs of detrimental effects, as behavioral shifts are usually an animal’s first response to environmental change. We asked professionals in the fields of ecology, conservation, and energy to identify important research questions, then held a workshop to reduce and clarify these questions. The priority research areas that emerged included animal perception of solar facilities, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions.
    • Influences of sex, incubation temperature, and environmental quality on gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor messenger RNA expression in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

      Moore, B.C.; Milnes, Mathew R.; Kohno, S.; Katsu, Y.; Iguchi, T.; LJ, Guilette, Jr; (2010)
      ...We have shown previously that gonads from wild-caught juvenile alligators express greater levels of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) than estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2).... These findings demonstrate that the mRNA expression of receptors required for steroid hormone signaling are modified by exposure to environmental factors, including temperature and contaminants.
    • Potential effects of a major hurricane on Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) reproduction in the Mississippi Sound

      Miller, Lance J.; Mackey, A.D.; Hoffland, A.D.; Solangi, M.; SA, Kuczaj, II; (2010)
      ...The purpose of the current report is to document the possible effect of increased reproduction for Atlantic bottlenose dolphins as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Data were utilized from ongoing opportunistic surveys conducted in the Mississippi Sound near Cat and Ship islands (see Fig. 1) as well as stranding data for Atlantic bottlenose dolphins provided by the Southeast Region Marine Mammal Stranding Network....