• 5.3 Grazing

      Becchetti, Theresa; Barry, Sheila; Honey, Marc; Ozeran, Rebecca; Defreese, Denise; de la Rosa, Charlie; Rao, Devii; Freese, Robert; Principe, Zach; Shomo, Brian (California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC), 2021)
      ...The information in this guide is organized into sections based on similarities in the certain techniques— either how they are applied or how they control a weed.... Grazing by cattle, sheep, and goats can be used as a technique for controlling weeds. There are differences in effectiveness among grazers depending on weed species and environments being targeted, but in general grazing (herbivory) for weed control varies more by the plants being grazed than the animals grazing them....
    • Alsophis sibonius (NCN) copulation

      Knapp, Charles R.; Shirk, P.L.; (2010)
      Alsophis sibonius is a diurnal, actively foraging snake inhabiting the Commonwealth of Dominica, West Indies....Here we report a field observation of copulation for A. sibonius from the Caribbean side of Dominica....
    • Altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) in Fanjingshang National Nature Reserve, China: Implications for conservation management of a flagship species

      Niu, K.; Tan, C.L.; Yang, Y.; (2010)
      Primate movements can include a substantial altitudinal component, depending on the complexity of the landscape and the distribution of the inherent vegetation zones. We investigated altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) at Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, China. The monkeys ranged at elevations between 1,350 and 1,870 m with an overall mean of 1,660 m….
    • Automated telemetry reveals post-reintroduction exploratory behavior and movement patterns of an endangered corvid, ʻAlalā (Corvus hawaiiensis) in Hawaiʻi, USA

      Smetzer, Jennifer R.; Greggor, Alison L.; Paxton, Kristina L.; Masuda, Bryce M.; Paxton, Eben H. (2021)
      Continuous movement monitoring is a powerful tool for evaluating reintroduction techniques and assessing how well reintroduced animals are adjusting to the wild. However, to date, continuous monitoring has only occurred for large-bodied species capable of carrying heavy tracking devices. In this study we used an automated VHF radio telemetry array to investigate the exploratory behavior and movement patterns of critically endangered ?Alal? (Corvus hawaiiensis), reintroduced to the Island of Hawai?i in 2017. The 11 juvenile ?Alal? we tracked exhibited high site fidelity and initial survival. Over time the birds showed decreased time spent at the supplemental feeders, and transitioned to more focused use of the landscape, suggesting increased foraging on wild food items. Birds with seemingly less spatial neophobia at release also made larger post-release exploratory movements. This study provides the first evidence that 1) supplemental feeding can support site fidelity for reintroduced ?Alal? without restricting a transition to independent foraging, and 2) that pre-release personality metrics may be useful predictors for predicting post-release movements of ?Alal?. Our work is the first to demonstrate the utility and power of automated telemetry for monitoring the reintroduction of small species.
    • Developmental stability of foraging behavior: evaluating suitability of captive giant pandas for translocation

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Martin-Wintle, Meghan S.; Owen, Megan A.; Zhou X.; Zhang H. (2018)
      The behavioral competence of captive-bred individuals - an important source population for translocation programs - may differ from that of wild-born individuals and these differences may influence post-release survival. Some behaviors will be more robust, or developmentally stable, than others in the face of the environmental novelties of captivity. Here, we investigated developmental stability of foraging behavior by quantifying bamboo feeding behavior in captive-bred and wild-born giant pandas, Ailuropoda melanleuca. As an energy-limited species adapted to a low-nutrition diet, any reductions in feeding efficiency may compromise post-release survival. Using video of 22 captive pandas, we measured several components of the panda's elaborate bamboo feeding behavior repertoire. We found that captive-born and wild-born pandas displayed the same repertoire of feeding behaviors, suggesting developmental stability in these motor patterns, but that they employed them differently with different parts of the bamboo. Captive-born pandas devoted less time and effort to handling and chewing leaves while allocating more effort to the consumption of large culms than did wild?born pandas. Captive-born pandas also handled small culm and stripped small culms to prepare them for consumption less often than did wild?born pandas. All of these behavioral differences indicate that wild-born pandas in captivity behave in a manner more similar to wild pandas, and focus their behavioral effort on more nutritious bamboo. Thus, these aspects of captive-born panda feeding behavior may be compromised, and were not developmentally stable in the captive environment. These behavioral differences are cause for concern and should be the subject of future study to determine whether they forecast compromised fitness in translocations. Evaluating developmental stability and behavioral competence should be a key component of captive-release translocation programs, serving to guide pre-release training and selection of individuals to be released.
    • Remote touch prey-detection by Madagascar crested ibises Lophotibis cristata urschi

      Cunningham, Susan J.; Castro, Isabel; Jensen, Thomas; Potter, Murray A.; (2010)
      Birds that forage by probing must often rely on sensory systems other than vision to detect their buried prey. Such senses may include hearing (e.g. Australian magpies (Atramidae), American robins (Turdidae)) or chemical senses/olfaction (e.g. kiwi (Apterygidae) and some shorebirds (Scolopacidae)). Probe foraging kiwi and shorebirds are also able to use vibrotactile cues to locate prey buried in the substrate at some distance from their bill‐tips (‘remote touch’). These birds possess an organ consisting of a honey‐comb of sensory pits in bone of the bill‐tips, packed with mechanoreceptive nerve ending (Herbst corpuscles). Such a bill‐tip organ has recently also been described in ibises (Threskiornithinae), but its function not elucidated. We designed a foraging experiment presenting mealworm prey to three captive Madagascar crested ibises Lophotibis cristata urschi under a variety of trial conditions to discover whether they were using remote touch, mediated by their bill‐tip organ; chemosense/olfaction; or hearing to locate buried prey. The ibises were reliant on remote touch for prey detection – the first time this sensory system has been demonstrated for this group of birds. They did not appear to use hearing or chemical senses/olfaction to aid in prey detection.
    • Size-related differences in the thermoregulatory habits of free-ranging Komodo dragons.

      Harlow, Henry J.; Purwandana, Deni; Jessop, Tim S.; Phillips, John A.; (2010)
      Thermoregulatory processes were compared among three-size groups of free-ranging Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) comprising small (5–20 kg), medium (20–40 gm) and large (40–70 kg) lizards. While all size groups maintained a similar preferred body temperature of 35, they achieved this end point differently. Small dragons appeared to engage in sun shuttling behavior more vigorously than large dragons as represented by their greater frequency of daily ambient temperature and light intensity changes as well as a greater activity and overall exposure to the sun. Large dragons were more sedentary and sun shuttled less. Further, they appear to rely to a greater extent on microhabitat selection and employed mouth gaping evaporative cooling to maintain their preferred operational temperature and prevent overheating. A potential ecological consequence of size-specific thermoregulatory habits for dragons is separation of foraging areas. In part, differences in thermoregulation could contribute to inducing shifts in predatory strategies from active foraging in small dragons to more sedentary sit-and-wait ambush predators in adults.