• 5.3 Grazing

      Becchetti, Theresa; Barry, Sheila; Honey, Marc; Ozeran, Rebecca; Defreese, Denise; de la Rosa, Charlie; Rao, Devii; Freese, Robert; Principe, Zach; Shomo, Brian (California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC), 2021)
      ...The information in this guide is organized into sections based on similarities in the certain techniques— either how they are applied or how they control a weed.... Grazing by cattle, sheep, and goats can be used as a technique for controlling weeds. There are differences in effectiveness among grazers depending on weed species and environments being targeted, but in general grazing (herbivory) for weed control varies more by the plants being grazed than the animals grazing them....
    • Depositional diseases

      Graham, E.A.; Burns, Rachel E.; Ossiboff, R. J.; Garner, Michael M.; Jacobson, Elliott R. (CRC Press, 2021)
      This book accompanies Infectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles, Second Edition to cover noninfectious diseases of reptiles, meeting the need for a similar, authoritative single-source reference. The volume features color photos of normal anatomy and histology, as well as gross, light, and electron microscopic imagery of diseases. Subjects range from neoplasia, nutrition, and metabolic disease, and deposition disorders to developmental anomalies, trauma, and physical diseases, and the unique contribution of paleopathology and diseases of bone. Each chapter is supported by numerous figures, many of which are unique and cannot be found in the published literature. Readers will note that some of the chapters are based on organ system, a trend that will continue into the next edition to encompass all of the basic organ systems. This book holds the most information ever accrued into one publication on noninfectious diseases and pathology of this class of animals, providing information on every aspect of the anatomy, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis. With up-to-the-minute data, a never-before-seen collection of images, and a stellar panel of contributors, Noninfectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles is the definitive resource for veterinarians, biologists, and researchers involved in the study of reptile diseases.
    • Tissue sampling methods and standards for vertebrate genomics

      Wong, P.B.Y.; Wiley, E.O.; Johnson, W.E.; Ryder, Oliver A.; O'Brien, S.J.; Haussler, C.; Koepfli, K.-P.; Houck, Marlys L.; Perelman, P.; Mastromonaco, G.; et al. (2012)
      The recent rise in speed and efficiency of new sequencing technologies have facilitated high-throughput sequencing, assembly and analyses of genomes, advancing ongoing efforts to analyze genetic sequences across major vertebrate groups. Standardized procedures in acquiring high quality DNA and RNA and establishing cell lines from target species will facilitate these initiatives. We provide a legal and methodological guide according to four standards of acquiring and storing tissue for the Genome 10K Project and similar initiatives as follows: four-star (banked tissue/cell cultures, RNA from multiple types of tissue for transcriptomes, and sufficient flash-frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA, all from a single individual); three-star (RNA as above and frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA); two-star (frozen tissue for at least 700 ?g of DNA); and one-star (ethanol-preserved tissue for 700 ?g of DNA or less of mixed quality). At a minimum, all tissues collected for the Genome 10K and other genomic projects should consider each species’ natural history and follow institutional and legal requirements. Associated documentation should detail as much information as possible about provenance to ensure representative sampling and subsequent sequencing. Hopefully, the procedures outlined here will not only encourage success in the Genome 10K Project but also inspire the adaptation of standards by other genomic projects, including those involving other biota.