• Altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) in Fanjingshang National Nature Reserve, China: Implications for conservation management of a flagship species

      Niu, K.; Tan, C.L.; Yang, Y.; (2010)
      Primate movements can include a substantial altitudinal component, depending on the complexity of the landscape and the distribution of the inherent vegetation zones. We investigated altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) at Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, China. The monkeys ranged at elevations between 1,350 and 1,870 m with an overall mean of 1,660 m….
    • Appendix 4: Annotated bibliography of books, journals, and web sites on captive management.

      Kenyon Barboza, K.; Coates, Linda L.; Kleiman, Devra G. (University of Chicago Press, 2010)
      ...Wild Mammals in Captivity presents the most current thinking and practice in the care and management of wild mammals in zoos and other institutions. In one comprehensive volume, the editors have gathered the most current information from studies of animal behavior; advances in captive breeding; research in physiology, genetics, and nutrition; and new thinking in animal management and welfare.....
    • Genetic structure of Rhinoceros Rock Iguanas, Cyclura cornuta, in the Dominican Republic, with insights into the impact of captive facilities and the taxonomic status of Cyclura on Mona Island

      Pasachnik, Stesha A.; Colosimo, Giuliano; Carreras-De León, Rosanna; Gerber, Glenn P. (2020)
      …To better understand the population structure of this species, we used a combination of mtDNA and nuclear markers to elucidate the genetic variation of wild populations across 13 sampling regions in the Dominican Republic (DR), as well as neighboring Mona Island, home to a Cyclura population of uncertain taxonomic status…. Our results suggest that the captive facilities may pose a threat to wild populations and increased regulation of these facilities is needed….
    • Guidelines for large herbivore translocation simplified: black rhinoceros case study

      Linklater, Wayne L.; Adcock, K.; du Preez, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Law, P. R.; Knight, M. H.; Gedir, J. V.; Kerley, G. I. H. (2011)
      ...We apply a 25‐year (1981–2005) data base including 89 reintroduction and 102 restocking events that released 682 black rhinoceros Diceros bicornis into 81 reserves to test 24 hypotheses for translocation success, defined as survival to 1 year post‐release. We made information‐theoretic comparisons of hypotheses represented as hierarchical models incorporating random effects for reserve and release cohort predictors of death....
    • Semi-quantitative tests of cyanide in foods and excreta of three Hapalemur species in Madagascar

      Yamashita, N.; Tan, Chia L.; Vinyard, C.J.; Williams, C.; (2010)
      Three sympatric Hapalemur species (H. g. griseus, H. aureus, and H. (Prolemur) simus) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar are known to eat bamboo food parts that contain cyanide…. In this study, we tested for the presence/absence of cyanide in bamboo lemur foods and excreta to (1) document patterns of cyanide consumption among species with respect to diet, (2) identify routes of elimination of cyanide from the gastrointestinal tract, and (3) determine whether cyanide is absorbed from the diet….
    • Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae): A review of conservation status

      Wibisono, Hariyo T.; Pusparini, Wulan; (2010)
      The majority of wild Sumatran tigers are believed to live in 12 Tiger Conservation Landscapes covering approximately 88 000 km2. However, the actual distribution of tigers across Sumatra has never been accurately mapped. Over the past 20 years, conservation efforts focused on the Sumatran tigers have increased, but the population continues to decline as a result of several key threats. To identify the status of the Sumatran tiger distribution across the island, an island-wide questionnaire survey comprised of 35 respondents from various backgrounds was conducted between May and June 2010. The survey found that Sumatran tigers are positively present in 27 habitat patches larger than 250 km2 and possibly present in another 2. In addition, a review on major published studies on the Sumatran tiger was conducted to identify the current conservation status of the Sumatran tiger. Collectively, these studies have identified several key factors that have contributed to the decline of Sumatran tiger populations, including: forest habitat fragmentation and loss, direct killing of tigers and their prey, and the retaliatory killing of tigers due to conflict with villagers. The present paper provides management authorities and the international community with a recent assessment and a base map of the actual distribution of Sumatran tigers as well as a general overview on the current status and possible future conservation challenges of Sumatran tiger management.
    • Urgent action needed: The forgotten forests of the Lavasoa-Ambatotsirongorongo Mountains, southeast Madagascar

      Eppley, Timothy M.; Refaly, Ernest; Tsagnangara, Cedric; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Donati, Giuseppe (2019)
      When we think of important areas of biodiversity within Madagascar, we tend to focus on the more well-known na-tional parks and special reserves. The truth is, however, that there are many small fragments scattered across this island that hold a significant wealth of biodiversity that are in criti-cal need of attention and immediate conservation actions. One such system is a group of six small forest fragments within the Lavasoa-Ambatotsirongorongo mountains in the extreme southeast of Madagascar. From east to west, these include Ambatotsirongorongo, Bemanasa, and Grand Lava-soa (Fig. 1). This last fragment is further divided into four fragments that are all in relatively close proximity....