• An interdisciplinary systems approach to study sperm physiology and evolution

      Shi, L.Z.; Nascimento, J.; Botvinick, E.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Berns, M.W. (2011)
      Optical trapping is a noninvasive biophotonic tool that has been developed to study the physiological and biomechanical properties of cells…. A real‐time automated tracking and trapping system (RATTS) is described that provides a remote user‐friendly robotic interface…. This combination of photonic physical and engineering tools has been used to examine the evolutionary effect of sperm competition in primates….
    • Appendix 4: Annotated bibliography of books, journals, and web sites on captive management.

      Kenyon Barboza, K.; Coates, Linda L.; Kleiman, Devra G. (University of Chicago Press, 2010)
      ...Wild Mammals in Captivity presents the most current thinking and practice in the care and management of wild mammals in zoos and other institutions. In one comprehensive volume, the editors have gathered the most current information from studies of animal behavior; advances in captive breeding; research in physiology, genetics, and nutrition; and new thinking in animal management and welfare.....
    • Climate change and the koala Phascolarctos cinereus: water and energy

      Ellis, William A.H.; Melzer, A.; Clifton, I.; Carrick, F.; (2010)
      We studied two groups of koalas during a drought in central Queensland to investigate potential impacts of climatic variability on the physiology and behaviour of this species. The tree use, water turnover, field metabolic rate and diet of koalas during autumn and spring were compared to a similar study of koalas in summer and winter, also in central Queensland, to generate a seasonal picture of the response of koalas to climatic variation....
    • Depositional diseases

      Graham, E.A.; Burns, Rachel E.; Ossiboff, R. J.; Garner, Michael M.; Jacobson, Elliott R. (CRC Press, 2021)
      This book accompanies Infectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles, Second Edition to cover noninfectious diseases of reptiles, meeting the need for a similar, authoritative single-source reference. The volume features color photos of normal anatomy and histology, as well as gross, light, and electron microscopic imagery of diseases. Subjects range from neoplasia, nutrition, and metabolic disease, and deposition disorders to developmental anomalies, trauma, and physical diseases, and the unique contribution of paleopathology and diseases of bone. Each chapter is supported by numerous figures, many of which are unique and cannot be found in the published literature. Readers will note that some of the chapters are based on organ system, a trend that will continue into the next edition to encompass all of the basic organ systems. This book holds the most information ever accrued into one publication on noninfectious diseases and pathology of this class of animals, providing information on every aspect of the anatomy, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis. With up-to-the-minute data, a never-before-seen collection of images, and a stellar panel of contributors, Noninfectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles is the definitive resource for veterinarians, biologists, and researchers involved in the study of reptile diseases.
    • Disorders of sexual development in wild and captive exotic animals

      Mastromonaco, G. F.; Houck, Marlys L.; Bergfelt, D. R. (2012)
      ...Compared to the wealth of information available on humans and domestic species, a better understanding of the factors influencing sexual development in wildlife is essential for developing and improving population management or conservation plans. This review attempts to bring together the different facets of DSDs as studied in the fields of reproductive physiology, endocrinology, ecotoxicology, wildlife biology, and environmental health.
    • Human and great ape red blood cells differ in plasmalogen levels and composition

      Moser, A.B.; Steinberg, S.J.; Watkins, P.A.; Moser, H.W.; Ramaswamy, K.; Siegmund, K.D.; Lee, D.R.; Ely, J.J.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Hacia, J.G. (2011)
      Plasmalogens are ether phospholipids required for normal mammalian developmental, physiological, and cognitive functions. They have been proposed to act as membrane antioxidants and reservoirs of polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as influence intracellular signaling and membrane dynamics. Plasmalogens are particularly enriched in cells and tissues of the human nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Humans with severely reduced plasmalogen levels have reduced life spans, abnormal neurological development, skeletal dysplasia, impaired respiration, and cataracts. Plasmalogen deficiency is also found in the brain tissue of individuals with Alzheimer disease.
    • Miller-Fowler's Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine Current Therapy

      Miller, R. Eric; Lamberski, Nadine; Calle, Paul; Miller, R. Eric; Lamberski, Nadine; Calle, Paul (Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019)
      Bringing together a globally diverse range of timely topics related to zoo and wild animals, Fowler’s Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine, Volume 9 is an invaluable tool for any professional working directly with wildlife and zoo animals. The text’s user-friendly format guides readers through biology, anatomy, and special physiology; reproduction; restraint and handling; housing requirements; nutrition and feeding; surgery and anesthesia; diagnostics, and therapeutics for each animal....
    • Physiological consequences of Arctic sea ice loss on large marine carnivores: Unique responses by polar bears and narwhals

      Pagano, Anthony M.; Williams, Terrie M. (2021)
      Rapid environmental changes in the Arctic are threatening the survival of marine species that rely on the predictable presence of the sea ice. Two Arctic marine mammal specialists, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and narwhal (Monodon monoceros), appear especially vulnerable to the speed and capriciousness of sea ice deterioration as a consequence of their unique hunting behaviors and diet, as well as their physiological adaptations for slow-aerobic exercise….
    • Scent-marking behavior by female sloth bears during estrus

      Khadpekar, Yaduraj; Whiteman, John P.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Owen, Megan A.; Prakash, Sant (2021)
      … Important aspects of sloth bear biology and ecology, such as reproductive physiology and behavior, are largely unknown. Increased scent-marking by anogenital rubbing during breeding season has been recorded in other bear species. We studied the genital rubbing behavior of 37 captive female sloth bears (2–18 yr of age) at the Agra Bear Rescue Facility, India, for 4 breeding seasons over a period of 3.5 years (1 Jun 2015 to 31 Dec 2018)….