• Climate suitability as a predictor of conservation translocation failure

      Bellis, Joe; Bourke, David; Maschinski, Joyce; Heineman, Katherine D.; Dalrymple, Sarah (2020)
      …We used species distribution models (SDMs) to predict the climate suitability of 102 release sites for amphibians, reptiles and terrestrial insects and compared suitability predictions between successful and failed attempts. We then quantified the importance of climate suitability relative to five other variables frequently considered in the literature to be important determinants of translocation success: number of release years, number of individuals released, life stage released, origin of the source population and position of the release site relative to the species’ range….
    • Conservation of amphibians and reptiles in the British Virgin Islands: status and patterns

      Perry, G.; Gerber, Glenn P.; Hailey, A.; Wilson, B.S.; Horrocks, J. (Brill Academic PublishersLeiden, The Netherlands, 2011)
      ...Invasive species are still arriving, establishing, and spreading. Thus, although the short-term conservation status of the BVI herpetofauna appears unlikely to change, we are more concerned about the mid-term outlook. We recommend some specific remedies intended to offset these pressures and provide long-term protection to the biota of the BVI
    • Depositional diseases

      Graham, E.A.; Burns, Rachel E.; Ossiboff, R. J.; Garner, Michael M.; Jacobson, Elliott R. (CRC Press, 2021)
      This book accompanies Infectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles, Second Edition to cover noninfectious diseases of reptiles, meeting the need for a similar, authoritative single-source reference. The volume features color photos of normal anatomy and histology, as well as gross, light, and electron microscopic imagery of diseases. Subjects range from neoplasia, nutrition, and metabolic disease, and deposition disorders to developmental anomalies, trauma, and physical diseases, and the unique contribution of paleopathology and diseases of bone. Each chapter is supported by numerous figures, many of which are unique and cannot be found in the published literature. Readers will note that some of the chapters are based on organ system, a trend that will continue into the next edition to encompass all of the basic organ systems. This book holds the most information ever accrued into one publication on noninfectious diseases and pathology of this class of animals, providing information on every aspect of the anatomy, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis. With up-to-the-minute data, a never-before-seen collection of images, and a stellar panel of contributors, Noninfectious Diseases and Pathology of Reptiles is the definitive resource for veterinarians, biologists, and researchers involved in the study of reptile diseases.
    • Mark-recapture accurately estimates census for Tuatara, a burrowing reptile

      Moore, J.A.; Grant, Tandora D.; Brown, D.; Keall, S.N.; Nelson, N.J.; (2010)
      Estimates of population size are necessary for effective management of threatened and endangered species, but accurate estimation is often difficult when species are cryptic. We evaluated effectiveness of mark–recapture techniques using the Lincoln–Peterson estimator for predicting true census size of a population of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), a burrowing reptile that is a conservation priority in New Zealand....
    • Revisiting the "real" Cuba

      Grant, Tandora D. (2011)