• An interdisciplinary systems approach to study sperm physiology and evolution

      Shi, L.Z.; Nascimento, J.; Botvinick, E.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Berns, M.W. (2011)
      Optical trapping is a noninvasive biophotonic tool that has been developed to study the physiological and biomechanical properties of cells…. A real‐time automated tracking and trapping system (RATTS) is described that provides a remote user‐friendly robotic interface…. This combination of photonic physical and engineering tools has been used to examine the evolutionary effect of sperm competition in primates….
    • Automated telemetry reveals post-reintroduction exploratory behavior and movement patterns of an endangered corvid, ʻAlalā (Corvus hawaiiensis) in Hawaiʻi, USA

      Smetzer, Jennifer R.; Greggor, Alison L.; Paxton, Kristina L.; Masuda, Bryce M.; Paxton, Eben H. (2021)
      Continuous movement monitoring is a powerful tool for evaluating reintroduction techniques and assessing how well reintroduced animals are adjusting to the wild. However, to date, continuous monitoring has only occurred for large-bodied species capable of carrying heavy tracking devices. In this study we used an automated VHF radio telemetry array to investigate the exploratory behavior and movement patterns of critically endangered ?Alal? (Corvus hawaiiensis), reintroduced to the Island of Hawai?i in 2017. The 11 juvenile ?Alal? we tracked exhibited high site fidelity and initial survival. Over time the birds showed decreased time spent at the supplemental feeders, and transitioned to more focused use of the landscape, suggesting increased foraging on wild food items. Birds with seemingly less spatial neophobia at release also made larger post-release exploratory movements. This study provides the first evidence that 1) supplemental feeding can support site fidelity for reintroduced ?Alal? without restricting a transition to independent foraging, and 2) that pre-release personality metrics may be useful predictors for predicting post-release movements of ?Alal?. Our work is the first to demonstrate the utility and power of automated telemetry for monitoring the reintroduction of small species.
    • Estimating daily walking distance of captive African elephants using an accelerometer

      Rothwell, E. S.; Bercovitch, Fred B.; Andrews, Jeff R. M.; Anderson, Matthew J. (2011)
      Two central concerns for elephant husbandry and management are whether zoological enclosures are appropriately sized and the degree to which naturalistic exercise and activity are observed in such enclosures. In order to address these issues, accurate data on the daily walking distance of elephants both in situ and ex situ are necessary. We used an accelerometer, a pedometer that measures step count and activity level, to estimate walking distance in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park….
    • Genetic variability in three native Iranian chicken populations of the Khorasan province based on microsatellite markers

      Mohammadabadi, M.R.; Nikbakhti, M.; Mirzaee, H.R.; Shandi, A.; Saghi, D.A.; Romanov, Michael N.; Moiseyeva, I.G.; (2010)
      This paper represents the results of a study on the genetic diversity in three native chicken populations (Barred, Brown and Black) of Khorasan, a province in northeastern Iran, by using four microsatellite markers (MCW0005, MCW0016, MCW0018 and MCW0034). Average number of alleles was found to be 5.25 per locus across all populations....
    • Mark-recapture accurately estimates census for Tuatara, a burrowing reptile

      Moore, J.A.; Grant, Tandora D.; Brown, D.; Keall, S.N.; Nelson, N.J.; (2010)
      Estimates of population size are necessary for effective management of threatened and endangered species, but accurate estimation is often difficult when species are cryptic. We evaluated effectiveness of mark–recapture techniques using the Lincoln–Peterson estimator for predicting true census size of a population of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), a burrowing reptile that is a conservation priority in New Zealand....
    • The sequence and de novo assembly of the giant panda genome

      Li, Ruiqiang; Fan, Wei; Tian, Geng; Zhu, Hongmei; He, Lin; Cai, Jing; Huang, Quanfei; Cai, Qingle; Li, Bo; Bai, Yinqi; et al. (2010)
      ...Here, using only Illumina Genome Analyser sequencing technology, we have generated and assembled a draft genome sequence for the giant panda with an assembled N50 contig size (defined in Table 1) reaching 40 kilobases (kb), and an N50 scaffold size of 1.3 megabases (Mb). This represents the first, to our knowledge, fully sequenced genome of the family Ursidae and the second of the order Carnivora....