• Conservation behaviour

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Mills, D.S.; Marchant-Forde, J.N.; McGreevy, P.D.; Morton, D.B.; Nicol, C.J.; Phillips, C.J.C.; Sandoe, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R. (CABICambridge, MA, 2010)
    • Conservation genetics of the black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis bicornis, in Namibia

      Van Coeverden de Groot, Peter J.; Putnam, Andrea S.; Erb, Peter; Scott, Candace; Melnick, Don; O’Ryan, Colleen; Boag, Peter T. (2011)
      Poaching and habitat destruction across sub-Saharan Africa brought the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) close to extinction. Over the past few decades, however, one of four subspecies, D. b. bicornis, has experienced a significant population increase as a consequence of its protection within Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia. We report here on the level and spatial distribution of black rhinoceros genetic diversity within ENP….
    • Conservation implications of inaccurate estimation of cryptic population size: Inaccurate estimation of cryptic population size

      Katzner, T. E.; Ivy, Jamie A.; Bragin, E. A.; Milner-Gulland, E.J.; DeWoody, J. A. (2011)
      ...Estimating population size is central to species‐oriented conservation and management. However, in spite of recent development in monitoring protocols, there are gaps in our ability to accurately and quickly estimate numbers of individuals present, especially for the cryptic and often non‐breeding components of structured vertebrate populations. Yet knowing the size and growth trajectory of all stage classes of a population is critical for species conservation. Here we use data from 2 years of non‐invasive genetic sample collection from the cryptic, non‐breeding component of an endangered bird of prey population to evaluate the impact of variability in population estimates on demographic models that underpin conservation efforts....
    • Conservation of amphibians and reptiles in the British Virgin Islands: status and patterns

      Perry, G.; Gerber, Glenn P.; Hailey, A.; Wilson, B.S.; Horrocks, J. (Brill Academic PublishersLeiden, The Netherlands, 2011)
      ...Invasive species are still arriving, establishing, and spreading. Thus, although the short-term conservation status of the BVI herpetofauna appears unlikely to change, we are more concerned about the mid-term outlook. We recommend some specific remedies intended to offset these pressures and provide long-term protection to the biota of the BVI
    • Critically endangered

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Mills, D.S.; Marchant-Forde, J.N.; McGreevy, P.D.; Morton, D.B.; Nicol, C.J.; Phillips, C.J.C.; Sandoe, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R. (CABICambridge, MA, 2010)
    • Cyclura: Natural History, Husbandry, and Conservation of West Indian Rock Iguanas

      Lemm, Jeffrey M.; Alberts, Allison C. (ElsevierSan Diego, CA, 2012)
      …Cyclura: Natural History, Husbandry, and Conservation of the West Indian Iguanas is the first book to combine the natural history and captive husbandry of these remarkable reptiles, while at the same time outlining the problems researchers and conservationists are battling to save these beautiful, iconic animals of the Caribbean islands…..
    • Demographic effects of legal timber harvesting on Guaiacum sanctum L., an endangered neotropical tree: implications for conservation

      López-Toledo, Leonel; Murillo-García, A.; Martínez-Ramos, M.; Pérez-Salicrup, D. (2011)
      Guaiacum sanctum is a timber tree species from the Americas, considered threatened in eleven different countries, including Mexico, and listed in CITES Appendix II. This species is currently harvested legally in the southern Mexican state of Campeche. Despite its protected status, the current condition of its populations and the effects of harvesting upon them have not been assessed. The conservation status of four unlogged populations were evaluated across Central Campeche by documenting their densities and demographic structures, and then compared the size class demographic structures of one unlogged and three logged populations at different times after harvest (3, 8 and 20 years) to evaluate the effects of timber harvesting upon population structure. Additionally, a regeneration index (proportion of seedlings within the population) was estimated for each of the seven populations. Densities of G. sanctum varied from 278 to 1732 stems/ha with ≥1cm at 1.3m·height in Campeche. Differences were found in the population structures of unlogged populations, although the density of seedlings and trees was high in all of the sites. Contrary to expectations, higher densities were found in all size classes in logged populations. Results suggest that current logging practices do not have a drastic negative effect on the density of remaining individuals. Although the results indicate that G. sanctum in Campeche is not locally endangered, it is recommend that it be maintained in CITES Appendix II.
    • Diagnosis and control of amphibian chytridiomycosis

      Pessier, Allan P.; Miller, R. Eric; Fowler, Murray E. (Elsevier SaundersSt. Louis, 2012)
      Chytridiomycosis is an emerging infectious disease associated with global amphibian population dec- lines. The causative agent, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a chytrid fungus with a broad host range documented to infect the skin of over 300 different frog and salamander species to date (www.spatialepidemiology.net/bd-maps)....
    • Ecology and conservation of the Turks Island boa (Epicrates chrysogaster chrysogaster: Squamata: Boidae) on Big Ambergris Cay

      Reynolds, R.G.; Gerber, Glenn P. (2012)
      The boid genus Epicrates contains 10 species in the West Indies, several of which are listed as threatened or endangered, whereas the status of the others remains unknown. Little is known about Turks Island Boas (Epicrates chrysogaster chrysogaster), a subspecies of the Southern Bahamas Boa endemic to the Turks and Caicos Islands, and no published ecological studies exist for this subspecies. A long history of human habitation, greatly exacerbated by exponentially increasing development in the last several decades, appears to be threatening the remaining populations of these boas. However, a lack of basic ecological information is holding back conservation efforts. Here we report on the first multiyear ecological study of Turks Island Boas, focusing on an important population located on the small island of Big Ambergris Cay in the southeastern margin of the Caicos Bank. Encounter rates of up to 3.5 snakes per person-hour make this population especially easy to study. We captured 249 snakes, 11 of which were recaptures. We provide basic natural history information including size, color pattern, girth, body temperature, abundance, diet, activity, diurnal refuge selection, and population size. We also clarify the known distribution and discuss the conservation concerns of this species. This study fills a gap in our ecological knowledge of Bahamian boas and will provide important baseline data for the Big Ambergris Cay population of Turks Island Boas as this small island undergoes extensive development over the next several decades.
    • Efforts to restore the California condor to the wild

      Wallace, Michael P. (2012)
      By the early 1980s new studies using radio telemetry and moult patterns to identify individuals indicated that only 21 California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) existed, with five pairs sporadically breeding. With continuous and poorly understood mortality, the decision was made to capture the remaining animals and in 1987 all 27 birds were placed in the protective custody of the San Diego and Los Angeles zoos, at which time the species was considered Extinct in the Wild....
    • Endangered species

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Mills, D.S.; Marchant-Forde, J.N.; McGreevy, P.D.; Morton, D.B.; Nicol, C.J.; Phillips, C.J.C.; Sandoe, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R. (CABICambridge, MA, 2010)
    • Evaluating the performance of captive breeding techniques for conservation hatcheries: A case study of the delta smelt captive breeding program

      Fisch, Kathleen M.; Ivy, Jamie A.; Burton, Ronald S.; May, Bernie (2013)
      The delta smelt, an endangered fish species endemic to the San Francisco Bay-Delta, California, United States, was recently brought into captivity for species preservation. This study retrospectively evaluates the implementation of a genetic management plan for the captive delta smelt population....
    • Evaluation of antibody response to vaccination against West Nile virus in thick billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha)

      Glavis, Jennifer; Larsen, R. Scott; Lamberski, Nadine; Gaffney, Patricia M.; Gardner, Ian (2011)
      West Nile virus (WNV) was first documented in North America in New York City in 1999. Several deaths attributable to WNV have been reported in captive thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha), an endangered psittacine native to North America. The serologic responses in 12 captive adult thick-billed parrots after a series of three initial WNV vaccine injections with annual boosters over 6 yr was evaluated....
    • Fitness costs of neighborhood disruption in translocations of a solitary mammal

      Shier, Debra M.; Swaisgood, Ronald R. (2011)
      We translocated Stephens’ kangaroo rats (Dipodomys stephensi), a solitary species listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, with and without neighboring kangaroo rats.… This study is the first empirical demonstration of the fitness consequences of disrupting social relationships among territorial neighbors.
    • Genetic structure of Rhinoceros Rock Iguanas, Cyclura cornuta, in the Dominican Republic, with insights into the impact of captive facilities and the taxonomic status of Cyclura on Mona Island

      Pasachnik, Stesha A.; Colosimo, Giuliano; Carreras-De León, Rosanna; Gerber, Glenn P. (2020)
      …To better understand the population structure of this species, we used a combination of mtDNA and nuclear markers to elucidate the genetic variation of wild populations across 13 sampling regions in the Dominican Republic (DR), as well as neighboring Mona Island, home to a Cyclura population of uncertain taxonomic status…. Our results suggest that the captive facilities may pose a threat to wild populations and increased regulation of these facilities is needed….
    • Induced pluripotent stem cells from highly endangered species

      Ben-Nun, Inbar Friedrich; Montague, Susanne C; Houck, Marlys L.; Tran, Ha T; Garitaonandia, Ibon; Leonardo, Trevor R; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Charter, Suellen J.; Laurent, Louise C; Ryder, Oliver A.; et al. (2011)
      For some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent extinction. We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two endangered species: a primate, the drill, Mandrillus leucophaeus and the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum cottoni. iPSCs may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations.
    • Investigating embryo deaths and hatching failure

      Rideout, Bruce (2012)
      Artificial incubation and hand-rearing allow aviculturists to greatly increase the reproductive potential of breeding populations. When one clutch is pulled for artificial incubation, a second clutch will typically be laid, which can then be parent-reared or also pulled for artificial incubation, thereby doubling or tripling reproductive output....
    • Land use change and the future of biodiversity

      Hobohm, Carsten; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Börtitz, Christine; Ralph Clark, V.; El Balti, Nadja; Fichtner, Andreas; Franklin, Scott; Gaens, Thomas; Härdtle, Werner; Hansen, Andreas Skriver; et al. (Springer International PublishingCham, Switzerland, 2021)
      This synthesis report is a meta-analysis of perspectives for biodiversity and ecosystems, with a strong focus on human impacts on the environment, and a work order to enable and manage the protection, survival and evolution of all species on Earth. The goal is to protect nature without any further species loss (Zero Extinction)....
    • Lead poisoning and the deceptive recovery of the critically endangered California condor

      Finkelstein, M. E.; Doak, D. F.; George, D.; Burnett, J.; Brandt, J.; Church, Molly; Grantham, J.; Smith, D. R. (2012)
      ...California condors were brought to the brink of extinction, in part, because of lead poisoning, and lead poisoning remains a significant threat today. We evaluated individual lead-related health effects, the efficacy of current efforts to prevent lead-caused deaths, and the consequences of any reduction in currently intensive management actions....
    • Mark-recapture accurately estimates census for Tuatara, a burrowing reptile

      Moore, J.A.; Grant, Tandora D.; Brown, D.; Keall, S.N.; Nelson, N.J.; (2010)
      Estimates of population size are necessary for effective management of threatened and endangered species, but accurate estimation is often difficult when species are cryptic. We evaluated effectiveness of mark–recapture techniques using the Lincoln–Peterson estimator for predicting true census size of a population of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), a burrowing reptile that is a conservation priority in New Zealand....