• The influence of landscape heterogeneity and dispersal on survival of neonate insular iguanas

      Knapp, Charles R.; Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Perez-Heydrich, Caro; (2010)
      ...We investigated the influence of habitat heterogeneity and dispersal patterns on neonate survival for the iguana Cyclura cychlura cychlura inhabiting Andros Island in the Bahamas. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was a clear survival advantage for neonates that spent more time in open mangrove habitat than relatively more closed-canopy habitats, most likely because of fewer primary predators in mangroves relative to other habitats....
    • Alsophis sibonius (NCN) copulation

      Knapp, Charles R.; Shirk, P.L.; (2010)
      Alsophis sibonius is a diurnal, actively foraging snake inhabiting the Commonwealth of Dominica, West Indies....Here we report a field observation of copulation for A. sibonius from the Caribbean side of Dominica....
    • Husbandry manual for West Indian iguanas

      Lemm, Jeffrey M.; Lung, N.; Ward, A.M.; (International Iguana FoundationFort Worth, TX, 2010)
    • Bringing the Tiger Back from the Brink—The Six Percent Solution

      Walston, Joe; Robinson, John G.; Bennett, Elizabeth L.; Breitenmoser, Urs; Fonseca, Gustavo A. B. da; Goodrich, John; Gumal, Melvin; Hunter, Luke; Johnson, Arlyne; Karanth, K. Ullas; et al. (2010)
      ...Wild tiger numbers are at an historic low. There is no evidence of breeding populations of tigers in Cambodia, China, Vietnam, and DPR Korea. Current approaches to tiger conservation are not slowing the decline in tiger numbers [1]–[3], which has continued unabated over the last two decades. While the scale of the challenge is enormous, we submit that the complexity of effective implementation is not: commitments should shift to focus on protecting tigers at spatially well-defined priority sites, supported by proven best practices of law enforcement, wildlife management, and scientific monitoring. Conflict with local people needs to be mitigated. We argue that such a shift in emphasis would reverse the decline of wild tigers and do so in a rapid and cost-efficient manner....
    • The cryptic genetic structure of the North American captive gorilla population

      Nsubuga, A.M.; Holzman, J.; Chemnick, Leona G.; Ryder, Oliver A.; (2010)
      Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) were imported from across their geographical range to North American zoos from the late 1800s through 1974.... Here, we analyze 32 microsatellite loci in 144 individuals using a Bayesian clustering method to delineate clusters of individuals among a sample of founders of the captive North American zoo gorilla collection....
    • Altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) in Fanjingshang National Nature Reserve, China: Implications for conservation management of a flagship species

      Niu, K.; Tan, C.L.; Yang, Y.; (2010)
      Primate movements can include a substantial altitudinal component, depending on the complexity of the landscape and the distribution of the inherent vegetation zones. We investigated altitudinal movements of Guizhou snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus brelichi) at Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve, China. The monkeys ranged at elevations between 1,350 and 1,870 m with an overall mean of 1,660 m….
    • Characterization of cultured adult Corturnix japonica testicular germ stem cells using seven stem cell markers.

      Jensen, Thomas; Poling, Matthew; Charter, Suellen; Durrant, Barbara S.; (2010)
      ...The large avian oocyte and the inability to consistently superovulate birds make techniques such as cloning and oocyte cryopreservation unlikely tools for avian conservation. Instead, the use of domestic birds as hosts to produce sperm of exotic species for use in artificial insemination may be a practical approach to conserve avian germplasm....
    • Appendix 4: Annotated bibliography of books, journals, and web sites on captive management.

      Kenyon Barboza, K.; Coates, Linda L.; Kleiman, Devra G. (University of Chicago Press, 2010)
      ...Wild Mammals in Captivity presents the most current thinking and practice in the care and management of wild mammals in zoos and other institutions. In one comprehensive volume, the editors have gathered the most current information from studies of animal behavior; advances in captive breeding; research in physiology, genetics, and nutrition; and new thinking in animal management and welfare.....
    • Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Adult Notophthalmus viridescens in North-Central Alabama, USA

      Bakkegard, Kristin; Pessier, Allan P.; (2010)
      ...We report on a haphazard collection of dead adult Notophthalmus viridescens discovered during a field zoology class trip conducted by KAB in Birmingham, Alabama....
    • Size-related differences in the thermoregulatory habits of free-ranging Komodo dragons.

      Harlow, Henry J.; Purwandana, Deni; Jessop, Tim S.; Phillips, John A.; (2010)
      Thermoregulatory processes were compared among three-size groups of free-ranging Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) comprising small (5–20 kg), medium (20–40 gm) and large (40–70 kg) lizards. While all size groups maintained a similar preferred body temperature of 35, they achieved this end point differently. Small dragons appeared to engage in sun shuttling behavior more vigorously than large dragons as represented by their greater frequency of daily ambient temperature and light intensity changes as well as a greater activity and overall exposure to the sun. Large dragons were more sedentary and sun shuttled less. Further, they appear to rely to a greater extent on microhabitat selection and employed mouth gaping evaporative cooling to maintain their preferred operational temperature and prevent overheating. A potential ecological consequence of size-specific thermoregulatory habits for dragons is separation of foraging areas. In part, differences in thermoregulation could contribute to inducing shifts in predatory strategies from active foraging in small dragons to more sedentary sit-and-wait ambush predators in adults.
    • Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae): A review of conservation status

      Wibisono, Hariyo T.; Pusparini, Wulan; (2010)
      The majority of wild Sumatran tigers are believed to live in 12 Tiger Conservation Landscapes covering approximately 88 000 km2. However, the actual distribution of tigers across Sumatra has never been accurately mapped. Over the past 20 years, conservation efforts focused on the Sumatran tigers have increased, but the population continues to decline as a result of several key threats. To identify the status of the Sumatran tiger distribution across the island, an island-wide questionnaire survey comprised of 35 respondents from various backgrounds was conducted between May and June 2010. The survey found that Sumatran tigers are positively present in 27 habitat patches larger than 250 km2 and possibly present in another 2. In addition, a review on major published studies on the Sumatran tiger was conducted to identify the current conservation status of the Sumatran tiger. Collectively, these studies have identified several key factors that have contributed to the decline of Sumatran tiger populations, including: forest habitat fragmentation and loss, direct killing of tigers and their prey, and the retaliatory killing of tigers due to conflict with villagers. The present paper provides management authorities and the international community with a recent assessment and a base map of the actual distribution of Sumatran tigers as well as a general overview on the current status and possible future conservation challenges of Sumatran tiger management.
    • Methods of estrus detection and correlates of the reproductive cycle in the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus)

      Frederick, Cheryl; Kyes, Randall; Hunt, Kathleen; Collins, Darin; Durrant, Barbara S.; Wasser, Samuel K.; (2010)
      The objective was to explore multiple methods for detecting and characterizing the reproductive cycle of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus). Thirteen H. m. euryspilus females, loaned from the Malaysian government to US zoos, were used....
    • Body temperature and thermoregulation of Komodo dragons in the field

      Harlow, Henry J.; Purwandana, Deni; Jessop, Tim S.; Phillips, John A.; (2010)
      ...We found that all size groups of dragons regulated a similar preferred body temperature by exploiting a heterogeneous thermal environment within savanna, forest and mangrove habitats. All dragons studied, regardless of size, were able to regulate a daytime active body temperature within the range 34–35.6 °C for 5.1–5.6 h/day....
    • Funding should come to those who wait

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Terborgh, John W.; Blumstein, Daniel T.; (2010)
      ... If long-term research is to flourish, we must build a reward system for studies characterized by deferred gratification. A sea change in these values must precede attempts to address funding....
    • The sequence and de novo assembly of the giant panda genome

      Li, Ruiqiang; Fan, Wei; Tian, Geng; Zhu, Hongmei; He, Lin; Cai, Jing; Huang, Quanfei; Cai, Qingle; Li, Bo; Bai, Yinqi; et al. (2010)
      ...Here, using only Illumina Genome Analyser sequencing technology, we have generated and assembled a draft genome sequence for the giant panda with an assembled N50 contig size (defined in Table 1) reaching 40 kilobases (kb), and an N50 scaffold size of 1.3 megabases (Mb). This represents the first, to our knowledge, fully sequenced genome of the family Ursidae and the second of the order Carnivora....
    • Artificial propagation and neonatal care of passerines as an effective tool for in-situ species recovery programs

      Switzer, Richard A.; Cristinacce, A.; Ladkoo, A.; Goltz, T.; Ward, G.; Kuehler, Cyndi M.; Lieberman, Alan A.; Jones, C.; (2010)
    • Inter-unit contests within a provisioned troop of Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in the Qinling Mountains, China

      Zhao, Q.; Tan, Chia L.; (2010)
      ... In this study, we studied inter‐unit contests in a provisioned troop of Sichuan snub‐nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). We spent 368 hr in contact with 9 one‐male units sharing the same home range, during which we recorded 148 inter‐unit contests at a provisioning site. Inter‐unit contests always started as inter‐individual contests....
    • Conspecific attraction

      Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Mills, D.S.; Marchant-Forde, J.N.; McGreevy, P.D.; Morton, D.B.; Nicol, C.J.; Phillips, C.J.C.; Sandoe, P.; Swaisgood, Ronald R. (CABICambridge, MA, 2010)