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dc.contributor.authorWilder, Aryn P.
dc.contributor.authorNavarro, Asako Y.
dc.contributor.authorKing, Shauna N. D.
dc.contributor.authorMiller, William B.
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Steven M.
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Cynthia C.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorShier, Debra M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-29T22:01:48Z
dc.date.available2020-05-29T22:01:48Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1572-9737
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10592-020-01272-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/327
dc.descriptionRestoring migration between fragmented populations can help reduce the risk of extinction. The endangered Pacific pocket mouse persists in three isolated populations in southern California. Continued declines coinciding with dramatic losses of genetic diversity prompted a conservation breeding program. Established by interbreeding founders from wild populations to provide a source of individuals for reintroductions, the breeding program also offers six generations of data and insight for managing wild populations. The data showed that reproductive success was higher in interbred individuals than founders from the smallest population, indicating a benefit to migration for this population. However, a sustained negative correlation between an individual’s reproductive success and its level of ancestry to the smallest population is consistent with a high load of harmful mutations. Together, the results suggest that facilitated migration should be unidirectional to (but not from) the smallest population to avoid introducing harmful genetic load into healthier populations.
dc.description.abstract... The endangered Pacific pocket mouse (Perognathus longimembris pacificus) persists in three isolated populations in southern California. Mitochondrial and microsatellite data indicated that effective population sizes were extremely small (Ne< 50), and continued declines prompted a conservation breeding program founded by individuals from each population....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-020-01272-8
dc.rights© Springer Nature B.V. 2020
dc.subjectCONNECTIVITY
dc.subjectINBREEDING
dc.subjectPOPULATION GENETICS
dc.subjectPACIFIC POCKET MICE
dc.subjectCALIFORNIA
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.titleFitness costs associated with ancestry to isolated populations of an endangered species
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleConservation Genetics
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage589
dc.source.endpage601
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstract... The endangered Pacific pocket mouse (Perognathus longimembris pacificus) persists in three isolated populations in southern California. Mitochondrial and microsatellite data indicated that effective population sizes were extremely small (Ne< 50), and continued declines prompted a conservation breeding program founded by individuals from each population....


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  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.
  • SDZWA Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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