Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRutz, Christian
dc.contributor.authorKlump, Barbara C.
dc.contributor.authorKomarczyk, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorLeighton, Rosanna
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorWischnewski, Saskia
dc.contributor.authorSugasawa, Shoko
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Michael B.
dc.contributor.authorJames, Richard
dc.contributor.authorSt Clair, James J. H.
dc.contributor.authorSwitzer, Richard A.
dc.contributor.authorMasuda, Bryce M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:18Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature19103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/346
dc.description.abstract...Here we show that another tropical corvid, the ‘Alalā (C. hawaiiensis; Hawaiian crow), is a highly dexterous tool user. Although the ‘Alalā became extinct in the wild in the early 2000s, and currently survives only in captivity5, at least two lines of evidence suggest that tool use is part of the species’ natural behavioural repertoire: juveniles develop functional tool use without training, or social input from adults; and proficient tool use is a species-wide capacity....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v537/n7620/abs/nature19103.html
dc.rights© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectALALA (‘ALALĀ)
dc.subjectHAWAIIAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectECOLOGY
dc.subjectCULTURE
dc.subjectSOUTH PACIFIC
dc.titleDiscovery of species-wide tool use in the Hawaiian crow
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleNature
dc.source.volume537
dc.source.issue7620
dc.source.beginpage403
dc.source.endpage407
dcterms.dateAccepted
html.description.abstract...Here we show that another tropical corvid, the ‘Alalā (C. hawaiiensis; Hawaiian crow), is a highly dexterous tool user. Although the ‘Alalā became extinct in the wild in the early 2000s, and currently survives only in captivity5, at least two lines of evidence suggest that tool use is part of the species’ natural behavioural repertoire: juveniles develop functional tool use without training, or social input from adults; and proficient tool use is a species-wide capacity....


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record