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dc.contributor.authorCroyle, Kaitlin E.
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Paul
dc.contributor.authorLight, Christine
dc.contributor.authorGoode, Eric
dc.contributor.authorDurrant, Barbara S.
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:21Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:21Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1098-2361
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/zoo.21273
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/360
dc.descriptionErratum published: https://doi.org/10.1002/zoo.21301 Croyle K, Gibbons P, Light C, Goode E, Durrant B, Jensen T, 2016. Chelonian Perivitelline Membrane‐Bound Sperm Detection: A New Breeding Management Tool. Zoo Biol 35:95–103. During the preparation of the article, the authors inadvertently neglected to acknowledge and appropriately reference essential project partners. The authors sincerely apologize for the oversight, and they hereby recognize their esteemed colleagues, veterinarians, and staff at Suzhou Zoo and Changsha Zoo for their long‐standing commitment to Rafetus conservation and for providing access to the R. swinhoei eggs as well as organizing access to laboratory facilities at University of Suzhou. The assistance provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society, especially the support of Professor Lu Shunqing, was invaluable to the success of the project. In addition, the authors wish to acknowledge the information presented in Gerald Kuchling's and Rick Hudson's Turtle Survival Alliance blogs on R. swinhoei (An Update on the World's Most Endangered Turtle by Rick Hudson, 2014, and Field surveys for wild Rafetus by Gerald Kuchling, 2012, www.turtlesurvival.org), and Gerald Kuchling's presentation of the reproductive exam of the R. swinhoei male at the 2015 Annual Symposium on the Conservation and Biology of Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles.
dc.description.abstractPerivitelline membrane (PVM)-bound sperm detection has recently been incorporated into avian breeding programs to assess egg fertility, confirm successful copulation, and to evaluate male reproductive status and pair compatibility. Due to the similarities between avian and chelonian egg structure and development, and because fertility determination in chelonian eggs lacking embryonic growth is equally challenging, PVM-bound sperm detection may also be a promising tool for the reproductive management of turtles and tortoises....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyErratum: https://doi.org/10.1002/zoo.21301
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/zoo.21273/abstract
dc.rights© 2015 Society for Conservation Biology, Wiley Periodicals
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectTORTOISES
dc.subjectTURTLES
dc.subjectFERTILITY
dc.subjectSPERM
dc.subjectEGGS
dc.subjectZOOS
dc.titleChelonian perivitelline membrane-bound sperm detection: A new breeding management tool
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleZoo Biology
dc.source.volume35
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage95
dc.source.endpage103
html.description.abstractPerivitelline membrane (PVM)-bound sperm detection has recently been incorporated into avian breeding programs to assess egg fertility, confirm successful copulation, and to evaluate male reproductive status and pair compatibility. Due to the similarities between avian and chelonian egg structure and development, and because fertility determination in chelonian eggs lacking embryonic growth is equally challenging, PVM-bound sperm detection may also be a promising tool for the reproductive management of turtles and tortoises....


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