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dc.contributor.authorGreggor, Alison L.
dc.contributor.authorBerger-Tal, Oded
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, Daniel T.
dc.contributor.authorAngeloni, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorBessa-Gomes, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorBlackwell, Bradley F.
dc.contributor.authorSt. Clair, Colleen Cassady
dc.contributor.authorCrooks, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorde Silva, Shermin
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Juricic, Esteban
dc.contributor.authorGoldenberg, Shifra Z.
dc.contributor.authorMesnick, Sarah L.
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Catherine J.
dc.contributor.authorSaltz, David
dc.contributor.authorSchell, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorSuarez, Andrew V.
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorWinchell, Clark S.
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, William J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:22Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:22Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0169-5347
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tree.2016.09.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/364
dc.description.abstractPoor communication between academic researchers and wildlife managers limits conservation progress and innovation. As a result, input from overlapping fields, such as animal behaviour, is underused in conservation management despite its demonstrated utility as a conservation tool and countless papers advocating its use. Communication and collaboration across these two disciplines are unlikely to improve without clearly identified management needs and demonstrable impacts of behavioural-based conservation management. To facilitate this process, a team of wildlife managers and animal behaviour researchers conducted a research prioritisation exercise, identifying 50 key questions that have great potential to resolve critical conservation and management problems. The resulting agenda highlights the diversity and extent of advances that both fields could achieve through collaboration.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534716301525
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES
dc.subjectCOMMUNICATION
dc.titleResearch priorities from animal behaviour for maximising conservation progress
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleTrends in Ecology & Evolution
dc.source.volume31
dc.source.issue12
dc.source.beginpage953
dc.source.endpage964
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-17T02:07:49Z
html.description.abstractPoor communication between academic researchers and wildlife managers limits conservation progress and innovation. As a result, input from overlapping fields, such as animal behaviour, is underused in conservation management despite its demonstrated utility as a conservation tool and countless papers advocating its use. Communication and collaboration across these two disciplines are unlikely to improve without clearly identified management needs and demonstrable impacts of behavioural-based conservation management. To facilitate this process, a team of wildlife managers and animal behaviour researchers conducted a research prioritisation exercise, identifying 50 key questions that have great potential to resolve critical conservation and management problems. The resulting agenda highlights the diversity and extent of advances that both fields could achieve through collaboration.


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    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).