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dc.contributor.authorAmato, Katherine R.
dc.contributor.authorMetcalf, Jessica L.
dc.contributor.authorSong, Se Jin
dc.contributor.authorHale, Vanessa L.
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorAckermann, Gail
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, Greg
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Kefeng
dc.contributor.authorCui, Duoying
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Hongxia
dc.contributor.authorSchrenzel, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorTan, Chia L.
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Rob
dc.contributor.authorBraun, Josephine
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:23Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:23Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2351-9894
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gecco.2016.06.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/371
dc.description.abstractPrimates of the Colobinae subfamily are highly folivorous. They possess a sacculated foregut and are believed to rely on a specialized gut microbiota to extract sufficient energy from their hard-to-digest diet. Although many colobines are endangered and would benefit from captive breeding programs, maintaining healthy captive populations of colobines can be difficult since they commonly suffer from morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) distress of unknown cause. While there is speculation that this GI distress may be associated with a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, no study has directly examined the role of the gut microbiota in colobine GI health. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to examine the gut microbiota of three genera of colobines housed at the San Diego Zoo: doucs (Pygathrix) (N=7), colobus monkeys (Colobus) (N=4), and langurs (Trachypithecus) (N=5). Our data indicated that GI-healthy doucs, langurs, and colobus monkeys possess a distinct gut microbiota. In addition, GI-unhealthy doucs exhibited a different gut microbiota compared to GI-healthy individuals, including reduced relative abundances of anti-inflammatory Akkermansia. Finally, by comparing samples from wild and captive Asian colobines, we found that captive colobines generally exhibited higher relative abundances of potential pathogens such as Desulfovibrio and Methanobrevibacter compared to wild colobines, implying an increased risk of gut microbial dysbiosis. Together, these results suggest an association between the gut microbiota and GI illness of unknown cause in doucs. Further studies are necessary to corroborate these findings and determine cause-and-effect relationships. Additionally, we found minimal variation in the diversity and composition of the gut microbiota along the colobine GI tract, suggesting that fecal samples may be sufficient for describing the colobine gut microbiota. If these findings can be validated in wild individuals, it will facilitate the rapid expansion of colobine gut microbiome research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2351989416300610
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectCOLOBUS
dc.subjectDOUC LANGUR
dc.subjectLANGURS
dc.subjectDIET
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.subjectGASTROENTEROLOGY
dc.titleUsing the gut microbiota as a novel tool for examining colobine primate GI health
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleGlobal Ecology and Conservation
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.beginpage225
dc.source.endpage237
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-17T02:07:49Z
html.description.abstractPrimates of the Colobinae subfamily are highly folivorous. They possess a sacculated foregut and are believed to rely on a specialized gut microbiota to extract sufficient energy from their hard-to-digest diet. Although many colobines are endangered and would benefit from captive breeding programs, maintaining healthy captive populations of colobines can be difficult since they commonly suffer from morbidity and mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) distress of unknown cause. While there is speculation that this GI distress may be associated with a dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, no study has directly examined the role of the gut microbiota in colobine GI health. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to examine the gut microbiota of three genera of colobines housed at the San Diego Zoo: doucs (Pygathrix) (N=7), colobus monkeys (Colobus) (N=4), and langurs (Trachypithecus) (N=5). Our data indicated that GI-healthy doucs, langurs, and colobus monkeys possess a distinct gut microbiota. In addition, GI-unhealthy doucs exhibited a different gut microbiota compared to GI-healthy individuals, including reduced relative abundances of anti-inflammatory Akkermansia. Finally, by comparing samples from wild and captive Asian colobines, we found that captive colobines generally exhibited higher relative abundances of potential pathogens such as Desulfovibrio and Methanobrevibacter compared to wild colobines, implying an increased risk of gut microbial dysbiosis. Together, these results suggest an association between the gut microbiota and GI illness of unknown cause in doucs. Further studies are necessary to corroborate these findings and determine cause-and-effect relationships. Additionally, we found minimal variation in the diversity and composition of the gut microbiota along the colobine GI tract, suggesting that fecal samples may be sufficient for describing the colobine gut microbiota. If these findings can be validated in wild individuals, it will facilitate the rapid expansion of colobine gut microbiome research.


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© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).