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dc.contributor.authorAuliya, Mark
dc.contributor.authorAltherr, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorAriano-Sanchez, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorBaard, Ernst H.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Carl
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Rafe M.
dc.contributor.authorCantu, Juan-Carlos
dc.contributor.authorGentile, Gabriele
dc.contributor.authorGildenhuys, Paul
dc.contributor.authorHenningheim, Evert
dc.contributor.authorHintzmann, Jürgen
dc.contributor.authorKanari, Kahoru
dc.contributor.authorKrvavac, Milivoje
dc.contributor.authorLettink, Marieke
dc.contributor.authorLippert, Jörg
dc.contributor.authorLuiselli, Luca
dc.contributor.authorNilson, Göran
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Truong Quang
dc.contributor.authorNijman, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorParham, James F.
dc.contributor.authorPasachnik, Stesha A.
dc.contributor.authorPedrono, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorRauhaus, Anna
dc.contributor.authorCórdova, Danny Rueda
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Maria-Elena
dc.contributor.authorSchepp, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorvan Schingen, Mona
dc.contributor.authorSchneeweiss, Norbert
dc.contributor.authorSegniagbeto, Gabriel H.
dc.contributor.authorSomaweera, Ruchira
dc.contributor.authorSy, Emerson Y.
dc.contributor.authorTürkozan, Oguz
dc.contributor.authorVinke, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorVinke, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorVyas, Raju
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:25Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:25Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2016.05.017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/387
dc.description.abstract…The European Union (EU) plays a major role in reptile trade. Between 2004 and 2014 (the period under study), the EU member states officially reported the import of 20,788,747 live reptiles. This review suggests that illegal trade activities involve species regulated under CITES, as well as species that are not CITES-regulated but nationally protected in their country of origin and often openly offered for sale in the EU….
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAdvancing reptile conservation: Addressing knowledge gaps and mitigating key drivers of extinction risk
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716301987
dc.rights2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
dc.subjectWILDLIFE TRADE
dc.subjectREGULATIONS
dc.subjectREPTILES
dc.subjectCITES
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectEUROPE
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CRIME
dc.titleTrade in live reptiles, its impact on wild populations, and the role of the European market
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBiological Conservation
dc.source.volume204
dc.source.beginpage103
dc.source.endpage119
dcterms.dateAccepted
html.description.abstract…The European Union (EU) plays a major role in reptile trade. Between 2004 and 2014 (the period under study), the EU member states officially reported the import of 20,788,747 live reptiles. This review suggests that illegal trade activities involve species regulated under CITES, as well as species that are not CITES-regulated but nationally protected in their country of origin and often openly offered for sale in the EU….


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    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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