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dc.contributor.authorNuijten, R. J. M.
dc.contributor.authorBosse, M.
dc.contributor.authorCrooijmans, Rpma
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, O.
dc.contributor.authorSchaftenaar, W.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorGroenen, M. A. M.
dc.contributor.authorMegens, H. J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T01:40:26Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T01:40:26Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2314-436X
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2016/5613862
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/392
dc.description.abstractThe list of threatened and endangered species is growing rapidly, due to various anthropogenic causes. Many endangered species are present in captivity and actively managed in breeding programs in which often little is known about the founder individuals. Recent developments in genetic research techniques have made it possible to sequence and study whole genomes. In this study we used the critically endangered Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) as a case study to test the use of genomic information as a tool in conservation management. Two captive populations of S. cebifrons exist, which originated from two different Philippine islands. We found some evidence for a recent split between the two island populations; however all individuals that were sequenced show a similar demographic history. Evidence for both past and recent inbreeding indicated that the founders were at least to some extent related. Together with this, the low level of nucleotide diversity compared to other Sus species potentially poses a threat to the viability of the captive populations. In conclusion, genomic techniques answered some important questions about this critically endangered mammal and can be a valuable toolset to inform future conservation management in other species as well.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ijg/2016/5613862.pdf
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016 Rascha J. M. Nuijten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPIGS
dc.subjectGENOMICS
dc.subjectCONSERVATION MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.subjectPHILIPPINES
dc.titleThe use of genomics in conservation management of the endangered Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons)
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Genomics
dc.source.beginpageArticle ID 5613862
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-17T02:07:49Z
html.description.abstractThe list of threatened and endangered species is growing rapidly, due to various anthropogenic causes. Many endangered species are present in captivity and actively managed in breeding programs in which often little is known about the founder individuals. Recent developments in genetic research techniques have made it possible to sequence and study whole genomes. In this study we used the critically endangered Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) as a case study to test the use of genomic information as a tool in conservation management. Two captive populations of S. cebifrons exist, which originated from two different Philippine islands. We found some evidence for a recent split between the two island populations; however all individuals that were sequenced show a similar demographic history. Evidence for both past and recent inbreeding indicated that the founders were at least to some extent related. Together with this, the low level of nucleotide diversity compared to other Sus species potentially poses a threat to the viability of the captive populations. In conclusion, genomic techniques answered some important questions about this critically endangered mammal and can be a valuable toolset to inform future conservation management in other species as well.


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Copyright © 2016 Rascha J. M. Nuijten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution
License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly
cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2016 Rascha J. M. Nuijten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.