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dc.contributor.authorMoss, Jeanette B.
dc.contributor.authorGerber, Glenn P.
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Mark E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T15:57:48Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T15:57:48Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0022-1503
dc.identifier.eissn1465-7333
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jhered/esz060
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/398
dc.description.abstractInbreeding depression, though challenging to identify in nature, may play an important role in regulating the dynamics of small and isolated populations. Conversely, greater expression of genetic load can enhance opportunities for natural selection. Conditional expression concentrates these opportunities for selection and may lead to failure of detection. This study investigates the possibility for age-dependent expression of inbreeding depression in a critically endangered population of rock iguanas, Cyclura nubila caymanensis. We employ heterozygote-fitness correlations to examine the contributions of individual genetic factors to body size, a fitness-related trait. Nonsignificant reductions in homozygosity (up to 7%) were detected between neonates and individuals surviving past their first year, which may reflect natural absorption of inbreeding effects by this small, fecund population. The majority of variation in neonate body size was attributed to maternal or environmental effects (i.e., clutch identity and incubation length); however, heterozygosity across 22 microsatellite loci also contributed significantly and positively to model predictions. Conversely, effects of heterozygosity on fitness were not detectable when adults were examined, suggesting that inbreeding depression in body size may be age dependent in this taxon. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of taking holistic, cross-generational approaches to genetic monitoring of endangered populations.
dc.description.sponsorshipMohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Funden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en_US
dc.rightsThis work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_modelen_US
dc.subjectINBREEDINGen_US
dc.subjectIGUANASen_US
dc.subjectCARIBBEAN ISLANDSen_US
dc.subjectPOPULATION GENETICSen_US
dc.titleHeterozygosity–Fitness Correlations Reveal Inbreeding Depression in Neonatal Body Size in a Critically Endangered Rock Iguanaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Heredityen_US
dc.source.volume110en_US
dc.source.issue7en_US
dc.source.beginpage818en_US
dc.source.endpage829en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-26T15:57:49Z
html.description.abstractInbreeding depression, though challenging to identify in nature, may play an important role in regulating the dynamics of small and isolated populations. Conversely, greater expression of genetic load can enhance opportunities for natural selection. Conditional expression concentrates these opportunities for selection and may lead to failure of detection. This study investigates the possibility for age-dependent expression of inbreeding depression in a critically endangered population of rock iguanas, Cyclura nubila caymanensis. We employ heterozygote-fitness correlations to examine the contributions of individual genetic factors to body size, a fitness-related trait. Nonsignificant reductions in homozygosity (up to 7%) were detected between neonates and individuals surviving past their first year, which may reflect natural absorption of inbreeding effects by this small, fecund population. The majority of variation in neonate body size was attributed to maternal or environmental effects (i.e., clutch identity and incubation length); however, heterozygosity across 22 microsatellite loci also contributed significantly and positively to model predictions. Conversely, effects of heterozygosity on fitness were not detectable when adults were examined, suggesting that inbreeding depression in body size may be age dependent in this taxon. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of taking holistic, cross-generational approaches to genetic monitoring of endangered populations.en_US


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