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dc.contributor.authorPrice, Catherine J.
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Peter B.
dc.contributor.authorGreggor, Alison L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T20:47:35Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T20:47:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier2047-2382
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13750-019-0156-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/41
dc.description.abstractAlien mammalian predators are a major cause of species extinction and decline globally. Baits and lures, usually human-food based (for example meat, nuts or oils), are widely deployed in trapping programs to attract target species, but their effectiveness compared to other types of olfactory lures, for example social odours or prey odours, has never been systematically examined. Depending on the context, there can be high proportions of non-target captures, for example when targeting feral cats using cage traps, or low capture success, for example, when targeting introduced rats on tropical islands. Here we use a systematic process to map evidence on the effectiveness of different categories of olfactory attractants for invasive mammalian predators within different ecological contexts. We aim to look for where evidence clusters and knowledge gaps occur, for example, across different lure types or across different habitat-types, and highlight opportunities for future research into behaviourally-relevant olfactory lures.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://environmentalevidencejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13750-019-0156-4
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectOLFACTION
dc.subjectPREDATORS
dc.subjectMAMMALS
dc.titleWhat evidence exists on the effectiveness of different types of olfactory lures as attractants for invasive mammalian predators? A systematic map protocol
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEnvironmental Evidence
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issueS1
dc.source.beginpage12
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-29T21:09:52Z
html.description.abstractAlien mammalian predators are a major cause of species extinction and decline globally. Baits and lures, usually human-food based (for example meat, nuts or oils), are widely deployed in trapping programs to attract target species, but their effectiveness compared to other types of olfactory lures, for example social odours or prey odours, has never been systematically examined. Depending on the context, there can be high proportions of non-target captures, for example when targeting feral cats using cage traps, or low capture success, for example, when targeting introduced rats on tropical islands. Here we use a systematic process to map evidence on the effectiveness of different categories of olfactory attractants for invasive mammalian predators within different ecological contexts. We aim to look for where evidence clusters and knowledge gaps occur, for example, across different lure types or across different habitat-types, and highlight opportunities for future research into behaviourally-relevant olfactory lures.


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