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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jessica L.
dc.contributor.authorKnapp, Charles R.
dc.contributor.authorGerber, Glenn P.
dc.contributor.authorThorpe, Roger S
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Mark E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T23:30:45Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T23:30:45Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1465-7333
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jhered/esv004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/422
dc.description.abstractIguana delicatissima is an endangered endemic of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. Phylogeographic analyses for many terrestrial vertebrate species in the Caribbean, particularly lizards, suggest ancient divergence times. Often, the closest relatives of species are found on the same island, indicating that colonization rates are so low that speciation on islands is often more likely to generate biodiversity than subsequent colonization events…. Despite the great distances between islands and habitat heterogeneity within islands, this species is characterized by low haplotype diversity.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/106/3/315/2961851
dc.rights© The American Genetic Association 2015
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectCARIBBEAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectPOPULATION
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titlePhylogeography of the endangered Lesser Antillean iguana, Iguana delicatissima: a recent diaspora in an archipelago known for ancient herpetological endemism
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal Of Heredity
dc.source.volume106
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage315
dc.source.endpage321
dcterms.dateAccepted
html.description.abstractIguana delicatissima is an endangered endemic of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. Phylogeographic analyses for many terrestrial vertebrate species in the Caribbean, particularly lizards, suggest ancient divergence times. Often, the closest relatives of species are found on the same island, indicating that colonization rates are so low that speciation on islands is often more likely to generate biodiversity than subsequent colonization events…. Despite the great distances between islands and habitat heterogeneity within islands, this species is characterized by low haplotype diversity.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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