Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHoeck, Paquita E. A.
dc.contributor.authorWolak, Matthew E.
dc.contributor.authorSwitzer, Richard A.
dc.contributor.authorKuehler, Cyndi M.
dc.contributor.authorLieberman, Alan A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T23:30:46Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T23:30:46Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2015.02.011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/428
dc.description.abstractWe used 17 years of captive breeding records of the Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) to study the effects of individual and parental level of inbreeding on survival through early life…. Our study contributes to evidence that the strength of inbreeding depression is particularly severe in early life traits. It shows that the negative effects of inbreeding on reproductive success should be accounted for even in benign captive environments where survival is maximized and suggests that parental incubation should be favored over artificial incubation in avian captive breeding programs.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000632071500066X
dc.rights© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectALALA (‘ALALĀ)
dc.subjectHAWAIIAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectINBREEDING
dc.subjectFERTILITY
dc.subjectINCUBATION
dc.subjectCARE OF EGGS
dc.titleEffects of inbreeding and parental incubation on captive breeding success in Hawaiian crows
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBiological Conservation
dc.source.volume184
dc.source.beginpage357
dc.source.endpage364
dcterms.dateAccepted
html.description.abstractWe used 17 years of captive breeding records of the Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) to study the effects of individual and parental level of inbreeding on survival through early life…. Our study contributes to evidence that the strength of inbreeding depression is particularly severe in early life traits. It shows that the negative effects of inbreeding on reproductive success should be accounted for even in benign captive environments where survival is maximized and suggests that parental incubation should be favored over artificial incubation in avian captive breeding programs.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record