Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGreggor, Alison L.
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, Daniel T.
dc.contributor.authorWong, Bob B. M.
dc.contributor.authorBerger-Tal, Oded
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T20:47:35Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T20:47:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier2047-2382
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13750-019-0164-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/43
dc.description.abstractIn the past few decades there has been a growing understanding of the role animal behavior research can play in improving the effectiveness and success of conservation management programs. Animal behavior can help us understand and predict the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on wildlife populations, can be used as a tool in conservation interventions, and can serve as a powerful indicator of conservation problems [1]. Overall, the emergent field of conservation behavior (applying animal behavior research to conservation and management) has already contributed to many successful conservation outcomes—from devising individual-specific diets to manage sex ratios in the critically endangered Kakapo [2], to promoting life skills that enhance survival after reintroduction of species into the wild [3,4,5,6]. Nevertheless, there is tremendous room for improvement. For example, olfactory deterrents can fail because they do not adequately recognize or manipulate context in the meaning of animal signals [7]. Meanwhile, traps designed in the laboratory to attract and control invasive species can prove ineffective under field conditions [8]. In many such cases, we simply do not understand the underlying causes of failures, which prevent us from offering sound and cost-effective guidance on conservation management. These failures and a common disregard for behavior in conservation settings have led to the valid criticism that the field lacks impact. We argue that the relevance of the field hinges on us being able to openly admit, distinguish, and understand where and why applying a behavioral approach succeeds and fails in improving conservation or management outcomes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://environmentalevidencejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13750-019-0164-4
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.titleUsing animal behavior in conservation management: a series of systematic reviews and maps
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEnvironmental Evidence
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issueS1
dc.source.beginpage23, s13750-019-0164-4
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-29T21:05:09Z
html.description.abstractIn the past few decades there has been a growing understanding of the role animal behavior research can play in improving the effectiveness and success of conservation management programs. Animal behavior can help us understand and predict the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on wildlife populations, can be used as a tool in conservation interventions, and can serve as a powerful indicator of conservation problems [1]. Overall, the emergent field of conservation behavior (applying animal behavior research to conservation and management) has already contributed to many successful conservation outcomes—from devising individual-specific diets to manage sex ratios in the critically endangered Kakapo [2], to promoting life skills that enhance survival after reintroduction of species into the wild [3,4,5,6]. Nevertheless, there is tremendous room for improvement. For example, olfactory deterrents can fail because they do not adequately recognize or manipulate context in the meaning of animal signals [7]. Meanwhile, traps designed in the laboratory to attract and control invasive species can prove ineffective under field conditions [8]. In many such cases, we simply do not understand the underlying causes of failures, which prevent us from offering sound and cost-effective guidance on conservation management. These failures and a common disregard for behavior in conservation settings have led to the valid criticism that the field lacks impact. We argue that the relevance of the field hinges on us being able to openly admit, distinguish, and understand where and why applying a behavioral approach succeeds and fails in improving conservation or management outcomes.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Greggor_2019_Environmental ...
Size:
721.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/