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dc.contributor.authorAbwe, Ekwoge E.
dc.contributor.authorMfossa, DM
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Bethan J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T23:30:49Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T23:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/447
dc.description.abstractThe Ebo forest in Littoral Region, Cameroon harbours a rich biodiversity of primates, including gorillas and chimpanzees. The government of Cameroon launched the gazettement of the Ebo forest into a national park in 2006. However, the decree creating the park is still awaited and there is little or no wildlife law enforcement on the ground (Morgan et al. 2011). The proximity of Ebo to major urban centres like Douala, Edea and Yaoundé is a major incentive to the hunting and bushmeat trade, especially as growing agricultural products is not commercially viable given the poor state of the roads around the forest. The forest is thus a main source of livelihood to adjacent communities that depend on unsustainable hunting and the bushmeat trade for protein and income (Morgan 2004). In addition to running two biological research stations in the west and east of the forest, the Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) has been working with local communities, traditional and administrative authorities around the forest to conserve its rich biodiversity and habitats while waiting for the official protection of the forest (Abwe and Morgan 2012). This article is aimed at providing a summary of the community-led conservation initiatives by traditional authorities and communities around the Ebo forest since 2012.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectCOMMUNITIES
dc.subjectCENTRAL AFRICA
dc.subjectGORILLAS
dc.subjectCHIMPANZEES
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectHUNTING
dc.subjectWILDLIFE TRADE
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.titleCommunity-led conservation action in the Ebo forest, Cameroon.
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleGorilla Journal
dc.source.volume50
dc.source.beginpage14
dc.source.endpage17
dcterms.dateAccepted
html.description.abstractThe Ebo forest in Littoral Region, Cameroon harbours a rich biodiversity of primates, including gorillas and chimpanzees. The government of Cameroon launched the gazettement of the Ebo forest into a national park in 2006. However, the decree creating the park is still awaited and there is little or no wildlife law enforcement on the ground (Morgan et al. 2011). The proximity of Ebo to major urban centres like Douala, Edea and Yaoundé is a major incentive to the hunting and bushmeat trade, especially as growing agricultural products is not commercially viable given the poor state of the roads around the forest. The forest is thus a main source of livelihood to adjacent communities that depend on unsustainable hunting and the bushmeat trade for protein and income (Morgan 2004). In addition to running two biological research stations in the west and east of the forest, the Ebo Forest Research Project (EFRP) has been working with local communities, traditional and administrative authorities around the forest to conserve its rich biodiversity and habitats while waiting for the official protection of the forest (Abwe and Morgan 2012). This article is aimed at providing a summary of the community-led conservation initiatives by traditional authorities and communities around the Ebo forest since 2012.


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