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dc.contributor.authorMiller, D.L.
dc.contributor.authorPessier, Allan P.
dc.contributor.authorHick, P.
dc.contributor.authorWhittington, R.J.
dc.contributor.editorGray M.
dc.contributor.editorChinchar V.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T18:02:31Z
dc.date.available2020-06-29T18:02:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-13754-4; 978-3-319-13755-1
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-13755-1_7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/456
dc.description.abstractRecognizing the pathological changes caused by ranaviruses, understanding how to properly collect test samples, and knowing what diagnostic tools to choose are key to detecting ranaviruses and in determining whether they are a factor in morbidity and mortality events. Whether infection occurs in fish, reptiles, or amphibians, clinical disease is typically acute and can affect a high proportion of the population. Among ectothermic vertebrates, affected individuals can present with hemorrhages, edema, and necrosis. Generally, microscopic examination reveals intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and necrosis of hematopoietic tissues, vascular endothelium, and epithelial cells. Ultimately, the type and severity of the lesions that develop vary depending upon the host species, type of ranavirus, or environmental factors. Our ability to identify lesions caused by ranaviruses is improving because of the knowledge gained from laboratory experiments and the improvement of existing, or development of new diagnostic tests. There is no single Gold Standard test for ranavirus detection, rather the diagnostic test chosen depends on the question asked. For example, a surveillance study may use quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to detect ranaviruses, but an investigation of a mortality event may use virus isolation, qPCR, histopathology, electron microscopy, and bioassay. To date, a treatment for ranavirus infections has not been found; however, vaccine development against iridoviruses is showing promise for both DNA and live vaccines within the aquaculture industry.
dc.language.isofr
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2015 Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectVIROLOGY
dc.subjectDIAGNOSIS
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titleComparative pathology of ranaviruses and diagnostic techniques
dc.typeBook Chapter
dc.source.booktitleRanaviruses, Lethal Pathogens of Ectothermic Vertebrates
dc.source.beginpage171–208
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-29T18:02:31Z
html.description.abstractRecognizing the pathological changes caused by ranaviruses, understanding how to properly collect test samples, and knowing what diagnostic tools to choose are key to detecting ranaviruses and in determining whether they are a factor in morbidity and mortality events. Whether infection occurs in fish, reptiles, or amphibians, clinical disease is typically acute and can affect a high proportion of the population. Among ectothermic vertebrates, affected individuals can present with hemorrhages, edema, and necrosis. Generally, microscopic examination reveals intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and necrosis of hematopoietic tissues, vascular endothelium, and epithelial cells. Ultimately, the type and severity of the lesions that develop vary depending upon the host species, type of ranavirus, or environmental factors. Our ability to identify lesions caused by ranaviruses is improving because of the knowledge gained from laboratory experiments and the improvement of existing, or development of new diagnostic tests. There is no single Gold Standard test for ranavirus detection, rather the diagnostic test chosen depends on the question asked. For example, a surveillance study may use quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to detect ranaviruses, but an investigation of a mortality event may use virus isolation, qPCR, histopathology, electron microscopy, and bioassay. To date, a treatment for ranavirus infections has not been found; however, vaccine development against iridoviruses is showing promise for both DNA and live vaccines within the aquaculture industry.
dc.publisher.locationNew York


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© The Author(s) 2015
Open Access
This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2015 Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/