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dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Matthew W.
dc.contributor.authorLocatelli, Sabrina
dc.contributor.authorGhobrial, Lora
dc.contributor.authorPokempner, Amy A.
dc.contributor.authorSesink Clee, Paul R.
dc.contributor.authorAbwe, Ekwoge E.
dc.contributor.authorNicholas, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorNkembi, Louis
dc.contributor.authorAnthony, Nicola M.
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Bethan J.
dc.contributor.authorFotso, Roger
dc.contributor.authorPeeters, Martine
dc.contributor.authorHahn, Beatrice H.
dc.contributor.authorGonder, Mary Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T18:02:32Z
dc.date.available2020-06-29T18:02:32Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1471-2148
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12862-014-0276-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/457
dc.description.abstractChimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) can be divided into four subspecies. Substantial phylogenetic evidence suggests that these subspecies can be grouped into two distinct lineages: a western African group that includes P. t. verus and P. t. ellioti and a central/eastern African group that includes P. t. troglodytes and P. t. schweinfurthii. The geographic division of these two lineages occurs in Cameroon, where the rages of P. t. ellioti and P. t. troglodytes appear to converge at the Sanaga River. Remarkably, few population genetic studies have included wild chimpanzees from this region.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-014-0276-y
dc.rights© 2015 Mitchell et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.subjectCHIMPANZEES
dc.subjectCENTRAL AFRICA
dc.subjectWEST AFRICA
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectPOPULATION GENETICS
dc.titleThe population genetics of wild chimpanzees in Cameroon and Nigeria suggests a positive role for selection in the evolution of chimpanzee subspecies
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBMC Evolutionary Biology
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.beginpage3
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-29T18:02:32Z
html.description.abstractChimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) can be divided into four subspecies. Substantial phylogenetic evidence suggests that these subspecies can be grouped into two distinct lineages: a western African group that includes P. t. verus and P. t. ellioti and a central/eastern African group that includes P. t. troglodytes and P. t. schweinfurthii. The geographic division of these two lineages occurs in Cameroon, where the rages of P. t. ellioti and P. t. troglodytes appear to converge at the Sanaga River. Remarkably, few population genetic studies have included wild chimpanzees from this region.


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© 2015 Mitchell et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Mitchell et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.