Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBurns, Rachel E.
dc.contributor.authorBicknese, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorQvarnstrom, Yvonne
dc.contributor.authorDeLeon-Carnes, Marlene
dc.contributor.authorDrew, Clifton P.
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Chris H.
dc.contributor.authorRideout, Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-13T23:11:24Z
dc.date.available2020-07-13T23:11:24Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1040-6387, 1943-4936
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1040638714544499
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/508
dc.description.abstractA 10-month-old, female African pygmy falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus) hatched and housed at the San Diego Zoo developed neurologic signs and died from a cerebral infection with the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis…. To the authors’ knowledge, this infection has not previously been reported in a bird in the United States and has not been known to be naturally acquired in any species in this region of the world. The source of the infection was not definitively determined but was possibly feeder geckos (Hemidactylus frenatus) imported from Southeast Asia where the parasite is endemic.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1040638714544499
dc.rights© 2014 The Author(s)
dc.subjectFALCONS
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.subjectPARASITOLOGY
dc.subjectDIAGNOSIS
dc.titleCerebral Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in a captive African pygmy falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus) in southern California
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
dc.source.volume26
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage695
dc.source.endpage698
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
html.description.abstractA 10-month-old, female African pygmy falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus) hatched and housed at the San Diego Zoo developed neurologic signs and died from a cerebral infection with the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis…. To the authors’ knowledge, this infection has not previously been reported in a bird in the United States and has not been known to be naturally acquired in any species in this region of the world. The source of the infection was not definitively determined but was possibly feeder geckos (Hemidactylus frenatus) imported from Southeast Asia where the parasite is endemic.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • SDZG Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Global staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.
  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record