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dc.contributor.authorBraun, Josephine
dc.contributor.authorSchrenzel, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorWitte, Carmel L.
dc.contributor.authorGokool, Larisa
dc.contributor.authorBurchell, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorRideout, Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-13T23:11:24Z
dc.date.available2020-07-13T23:11:24Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0090-3558
dc.identifier.doi10.7589/2013-09-231
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/509
dc.description.abstractMycoplasmas are an important cause of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and have been a main focus in attempts to mitigate disease-based population declines. Infection risk can vary with an animal's population of origin, making screening tests popular tools for determining infection status in individuals and populations…. Our findings suggest that mycoplasmas are not the only agents of concern and that a single M. agassizii ELISA or nasal flush qPCR alone failed to identify all potentially infected animals in a population….
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/10.7589/2013-09-231
dc.subjectDESERT TORTOISES
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.subjectDIAGNOSIS
dc.subjectNEVADA
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.titleMolecular methods to detect Mycoplasma spp. and testudinid herpesvirus 2 in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and implications for disease management
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Wildlife Diseases
dc.source.volume50
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage757
dc.source.endpage766
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
html.description.abstractMycoplasmas are an important cause of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and have been a main focus in attempts to mitigate disease-based population declines. Infection risk can vary with an animal's population of origin, making screening tests popular tools for determining infection status in individuals and populations…. Our findings suggest that mycoplasmas are not the only agents of concern and that a single M. agassizii ELISA or nasal flush qPCR alone failed to identify all potentially infected animals in a population….


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  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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